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MELISH, John (1771-1822).

Verlag: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1816. (1816)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1816., 1816. EXCEPTIONALLY FINE engraved folding map (36 x 58 4/8 inches) by J. Vallance and H.S. Tanner, laid down on cartographic linen in 40 sections, edged with green silk, with original hand-colour in outline (some occasional pale spotting), folds with marbled end sheets; contemporary half red roan, marbled paper boards portfolio, two pairs of linen ties. THE FIRST AMERICAN-PRODUCED WALL MAP DEPICTING THE COUNTRY FROM COAST TO COAST. Apparently the fourth state, with Cadiz, Washington, Cambridge, Adelphi, Mansfield and Wooster added in Ohio and "Vevay or" added before "Swiss Vineyards" in southeastern Indiana. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris. Incorporating data from state and military maps as these became available, Melish frequently revised and corrected the plates, limiting each printing to 100 copies" (Seymour I. Schwartz and Ralph E. Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, Edison, NJ, 2001, p.238). "I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace" (anonymous, recorded by Melish in his "Geographical Intelligence", 1818). Melish published the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast, inspired by a friend who wrote to him "during the progress of war. a very respectable Friend in Philadelphia, when talking of the Map of the Seat of War, said 'I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace.' The hint was not lost. The author had seen the good effects of maps, particularly when accompanied by descriptions." (reported by Ristow). Determined to keep his maps contemporary Melish is reknowned for reissuing numerous revisions of his maps: new editions, in a total of 24 issues, of this map were published in 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1823, and Melish himself outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 edition of "Geographical Description": "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as a part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from a conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." (reported by Ristow). Martin/Ristow 24; Streeter VI:3798. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72map44

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MELISH, John (1771-1822).

Verlag: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1820. (1820)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1820., 1820. Folding engraved map (43 4/8 x 57 inches), 36 segments mounted on linen and hand-colored in a contemporary hand (some separation at folds, intermittent browning and slight offsetting); contemporary green paper boards slipcase, manuscript paper label on front cover (extremities worn with loss of one side strip). "I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace" (anonymous, recorded by Melish in his "Geographical Intelligence", 1818). 1820 edition, the RARE LARGE ISSUE, with the imprint reading "Entered according to Act of Congress the 16th day of June 1820." Melish published the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast in 1816, distinguishing him as "the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris." (Schwartz and Ehrenberg). Melish was inspired to create a large wall map of America by a friend who wrote to him "during the progress of war a very respectable Friend in Philadelphia, when talking of the Map of the Seat of War, said 'I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace.' The hint was not lost. The author had seen the good effects of maps, particularly when accompanied by descriptions " (reported by Ristow). Determined to keep his maps contemporary Melish is reknowned for reissuing numerous revisions of his maps: new editions, in a total of 24 issues, of this map were published in 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1823. Eight variants of the 1820 edition have been identified by Ristow. Melish himself outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 edition of "Geographical Description": "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as a part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from a conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." (reported by Ristow). This 1820 issue was the first to be published in the enlarged format. Ristow pp. 186-197; Schwartz and Ehrenberg page 238. [With:] MELISH, John. A Geographical Description of the United States, with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions, intended as an Accompaniment to Melish's Map of these Countries. Philadelphia: for the Author, 1816. 8vo (8 1/8 x 5 inches). Errata leaf tipped-in before the title-page. Four engraved plates of plans of Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore (some browning and offsetting). Pages 167-182 publisher's advertisements, engraved folding hand-colored specimen map of Pennsylvania, and three pages of instructions and prospectus for constructing state and county maps of Pennsylvania. Contemporary half red roan, marbled boards (rebacked, front free endpaper replaced). Provenance: Contemporary signature of James Buchanan, 15th President of the United States (1857-1861), on the title-page; one or two contemporary annotations to the text and underscorings; Anonymous sale Sotheby's 25th January 1977, lot 82; Charles J. Tanenbaum, Collection of American Cartography. Second, enlarged edition. FROM THE LIBRARY OF JAMES BUCHANAN (1791-1868): "tall, stately, stiffly formal in the high stock he wore around his jowls, James Buchanan was the only President who never married. Presiding over a rapidly dividing Nation, Buchanan grasped inadequately the political r. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 001993

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MELISH, John (1771-1822).

Verlag: Philadelphia: James Finlayson successor to John Melish, 1823. (1823)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: James Finlayson successor to John Melish, 1823., 1823. Folding engraved map (45 x 57 4/8 inches), in 50 sections mounted on cartographic linen, with original hand-color in outline, with small inset of West Indies lower right, and statistical table lower left (intermittent browning and slight offsetting, linen with a few stains); original marbled paper self covers on verso. Provenance: with the ownership inscription of E. Harkness on the front cover. "I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace" (anonymous, recorded by Melish in his "Geographical Intelligence", 1818). 1820 edition, the large issue, with the imprint reading "Entered according to Act of Congress the 16th day of June 1820", with "improvements to 1823". Melish published the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast in 1816, distinguishing him as "the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris." (Schwartz and Ehrenberg). Melish was inspired to create a large wall map of America by a friend who wrote to him "during the progress of war. a very respectable Friend in Philadelphia, when talking of the Map of the Seat of War, said 'I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace.' The hint was not lost. The author had seen the good effects of maps, particularly when accompanied by descriptions." (reported by Ristow). Determined to keep his maps contemporary Melish is renowned for reissuing numerous revisions of his maps: new editions, in a total of 24 issues, of this map were published in 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1823. Eight variants of the 1820 edition have been identified by Ristow. Melish himself outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 edition of "Geographical Description": "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as a part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from a conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." (reported by Ristow pages 186-197). Schwartz and Ehrenberg page 238. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72map87

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AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851).

Verlag: Philadelphia: J. B. Chevalier, [1839-] 1840-1844. (1844)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: J. B. Chevalier, [1839-] 1840-1844., 1844. 7 volumes. 8vo., (10 1/8 x 6 4/8 inches). Half-titles, subscribers' lists at end of each volume. 500 hand-colored lithographed plates after Audubon by W.E. Hitchcock, R. Trembly and others, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, wood-engraved anatomical diagrams in text (intermittent offsetting and spotting, particularly to the tissue guards and corresponding text leaves at the beginning and end of each volume). Original publisher's deluxe binding of maroon morocco gilt, elaborately decorated in gilt (extremities a bit rubbed). The first octavo edition of John James Audubon's masterpiece, a tall copy with colors very clean and fresh. Audubon created 65 new images for the octavo edition, supplementing the original 435 of the double-elephant folio edition of 1827-1838. The resulting series of 500 plates constitutes the most extensive American color-plate book produced up to that time. The Philadelphia printer J.T. Bowen reduced the double-elephant plates by camera lucida and the resulting lithographs show significant changes in the backgrounds and compositions. The original configurations of the elephant folio were altered so that only one species is depicted per plate. The text revision of the 'Ornithological Biography' was rearranged according to Audubon's "A Synopsis of the Birds of North America" (1839). "The genesis of Audubon's career as a painter may be said to have taken place in 1810, when the Scots-American ornithologist Alexander Wilson stopped in Henderson to seek subscriptions for his 'American Ornithology'. Audubon was approving of Wilson's efforts and was prepared to subscribe when his partner Rozier intervened. Rozier pointed out that the partners lacked the discretionary funds for such an investment and also suggested that Audubon was much the superior artist. Wilson departed without the hoped-for subscription. Not until 1820, however, when he was thirty-five and after years of disappointment in business, did Audubon conclude that he wanted to publish an ambitious folio of all American birds. Accompanying him on the first of several collecting and painting trips was young Joseph Mason, the first of several associates who later would paint at least fifty backgrounds for Audubon's bird plates. Following this trip, Audubon spent some months in New Orleans making a modest living sketching portraits and then as tutor to Eliza Pirrie at the plantation owned by the latter's father on Bayou Sara. Throughout, he gradually began accumulating his bird pictures. "A trip to Philadelphia in 1824 to look into the possibilities of publication and other support was a disaster. Audubon foolishly antagonized the artist Titian Peale and the engraver Alexander Lawson, who were preparing illustrations for Charles Lucien Bonaparte's 'American Ornithology; or, The Natural History of Birds Inhabiting the United States, Not Given by Wilson'. With his criticisms of Wilson's artistry, he also infuriated the Philadelphia businessman and naturalist George Ord, Wilson's friend, editor, biographer, and champion, who became Audubon's lifelong enemy and did whatever he could to block Audubon's success in the United States. Following Ord's lead, most Philadelphia naturalists and engravers refused to assist Audubon with his project. Audubon now concluded that he had no choice but to go to Europe to seek out engravers and printers, and this he did with money he and Lucy earned from teaching the children of the Percy family of Beechwood Plantation near New Orleans in 1825 and early 1826. "Arriving in Liverpool, England, in July 1826, Audubon soon found the support and fame that had so long eluded him in the United States. He went on to Manchester, where the response to his work was tepid, and then to Edinburgh, Scotland, where he found not only more support but William H. Lizars, the engraver he had been looking for. There he matured his ideas concerning his project and decided on an elephant folio on a subscription basis. He took time to fulfill a long. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72nhr129

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Buchbeschreibung: Columbia [Tx.]. Nov. 1, 1836., 1836. [3]pp. on a folded folio sheet. Addressed for mailing (apparently in Houston's hand) on the blank fourth page, with a circular New Orleans postmark (in blue ink), a note "2/3" in red ink, and "10 for. 85" in black ink. Old folds from mailing, two small remnants of old red wax seal. Small hole from a seal, not affecting text. Two small tears near a cross-fold, affecting five letters of text. In very good condition. An outstanding letter from Sam Houston, one of the towering figures in Texas history, written just days after he became President of the Republic of Texas, and a little more than six months after he led Texian forces to victory at the Battle of San Jacinto, which secured the independence of Texas from Mexico. Samuel Houston (1793-1863) was elected President of the Republic of Texas on September 5, 1836, and became President on October 22, succeeding David Burnet, who had been interim President the previous seven months. In this letter Houston notes that "the eyes of the world are upon us," and that Texas is but an "infant Republic just emerging from the political season" with "difficulties and dangers on every side." He goes on to assert, however, that "these difficulties and dangers have been gloriously surmounted, and the bright star of Texian independence is seen moving rapidly onward to the meridian of its glory." Houston makes reference to his victory at San Jacinto, his initial disinclination to seek office, and exhibits gratitude to the people of Texas in investing him with their confidence by making him president of the fledgling Republic. Significantly, Houston writes that "the people of Texas have shown through the ballot box at the late election that they are decidedly in favor of annexation to the United States, and it is a matter worthy to be made known throughout your country." This is a remarkably early pronouncement from Houston on the desirability of annexing Texas to the United States, a subject that Houston returned to in his address to the Texas Legislature in May, 1837. He discusses the "common ancestry" of the peoples of both nations, urges Heyward to use the American press to lobby for annexation, and lauds Texas as a market for goods and produce from the United States. Houston closes the letter by attacking his predecessor and political enemy, former Texas President David Burnet, whom he calls "a poor dog, and I believe a very bad man, if not corrupt." Burnet and Houston were longstanding antagonists, and the two men would face each other again in a contentious campaign for President of Texas in 1841. The animosity between the two became so great that Burnet challenged Houston to a duel, which the latter declined. Houston wrote this letter to Elijah Hayward (1786-1864), a prominent Ohio lawyer and former judge of the Ohio Supreme Court, who had recently resigned his position as Commissioner of the General Land Office in Washington, DC. The relationship between Houston and Hayward is unclear, though the tone of this letter is certainly warm. Houston wrote this letter from Columbia, Texas, which from September to December, 1836, served as the capital of the Republic of Texas. The bulk of the letter is in a secretarial hand; Houston, always an erratic speller, generally preferred to dictate official correspondence. Houston writes: "Dear Sir, I have just received your letter of the 6th August, and it gives me much pleasure to know that although far removed from the most of my old friends in the United States, they still evince some interest in my own prosperity and an anxious solicitude for the success of the great cause of political and religious liberty in Texas. "The eyes of the world are upon us, and the events of the last twelve months have excited the generous sympathies of any patriot heart. We are an infant Republic just emerging from the political season, dark and gloomy have been our prospects, difficulties and dangers have attended on every side, but that gloom has in a great measure be. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 47218

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BRADLEY, Abraham, Jr. (1767-1838)

Verlag: Philadelphia, 1804 [but After 1812] (1812)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia, 1804 [but After 1812], 1812. Fine folding engraved map, float-mounted and framed (framed dimensions: 38 x 52 inches), laid down on cartographical linen in 32 sections, with original hand-colour in outline and in part. Fourth edition, corrected to 1812, showing both Louisiana and Missouri Territory, established in 1812. The Mississippi River from the junction of the Ohio north to the Wyaconda River has been redrawn due to the public surveys in southern Illinois, exhibted by the addition of Township and Range lines. "Numerous other changes from the 1804 edition have been made throughout the map adding new counties, towns, roads, and changed physical features, primarily in the mid and western portions. Since it was a postal map and needed to be current as to towns, road and counties, it is probable that the map was updated every few years, until a new plate was made in 1819 by Harrison (Karpinski 59, Karrow 1-1466). The 1796 edition of this map (a different engraving) was changed four times in as many years (Wheat & Brun 127-130). The 1819 edition became the official post office map in 1825, used until 1829 (Ristow). All of the 1804 to 1812 editions were originally engraved by Francis Shallus of Philadelphia" (David Rumsey 2929001). Abraham Bradley, Jr.'s Map of the United States was a landmark production, arguably the first such detailed map produced by an American mapmaker and a visual testament to the growing expertise of the country's printers and cartographers after the triumph of the Revolution. An indigenous cartography sprang up and eventually flourished during the nineteenth century in response to nationalism, exploration, settlement, war, rising literacy, and finally, the exploitation of natural resources. Appointed a clerk in the American general post office in 1791 "Bradley's best known accomplishment was his authorship of a notable map of the United States, the first edition of which appeared in 1796, and the second in 1804, following the acquisition of the Louisiana territory. Bradley's maps were hung in many of the republic's post offices and were reprinted in Jedidiah Morse's American Universal Geography. Historians have agreed that the 1796 edition provides the best source of information about the geographical extent of the United States in the decade following the adoption of the federal Constitution. To a greater degree than almost any other single document published during this period, Bradley's maps helped to impress ordinary Americans with the size of the country and to transform the ill-defined frontier into a sharply etched border. "Bradley also coordinated the movement of the mail and took great pride in his almost encyclopedic knowledge of every single postal route in the country. Since most stagecoach firms relied on mail contracts to cover their costs, Bradley was thus largely responsible for the scheduling of passenger service throughout the United States. Though Bradley supported the subsidization of the stagecoach industry, he remained troubled by the potential for abuse. This was particularly true during the administration of Andrew Jackson; Bradley publicly denounced the Jacksonians for their "stage mania," by which he meant their lavish policy of subsidizing the industry with little regard to cost (John, p. 243). "To help keep expenses under control, Bradley personally supervised the payment of mail contractors, a challenging task. Because the United States lacked a single currency during this period, it was difficult to pay agents who lived at a great distance from Washington. To help overcome this problem, Bradley assumed the presidency of the Union Bank of Georgetown at some point prior to 1820. This made it possible for Bradley's signature to appear on the bank notes that the general post office disbursed. The fact that Bradley's signature was well known facilitated the transmission of postal revenue from the general post office to the contractors in the field" (Richard R. John for ANB). P-Maps p874; Ristow p70-1; Schwar. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 1016mb1

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner, 1825., 1825. Letterpress half title, 1p. index, and 18pp. text. Engraved title with vignette of the "First Landing of Columbus in the New World." Twenty-one fine handcolored engraved map sheets (sixteen maps on sixteen double page sheets, one map on folding sheet, map of United States on four double page sheets). Folio. Expertly bound to style in half brown straight- grained morocco and contemporary marbled boards, spine gilt. Very good. In a red half morocco and cloth box, spine gilt. A fine copy of the second edition of "one the most magnificent atlases ever published in the United States," engraved during the "Golden Age of American Cartography" (Ristow). Tanner's NEW AMERICAN ATLAS contains the most accomplished series of maps of America that had yet appeared in an atlas. Of the greatest importance were the maps of American states, which were highly detailed and brilliantly colored. While New York and Florida each had their own dedicated page, other double-page sheets showcased multiple states at a time. As the title claims, these maps were drawn up using a careful combination of original surveys and the best existing published sources. The evident high cost of production meant that the publishers took the decision to issue the maps originally in five separate parts which were published from 1819 to 1823. A first collected edition was published in 1823, and this second revised edition appeared in 1825. The maps, all of which are carefully handcolored, include a world map, four maps of continents, a map of South America on a large folding sheet made up from two joined sheets (the index calls for two separate sheets), a map of North America on four sheets, and eleven double-page maps of the various states. The very large map of North America is of particular beauty and note. "This map was a landmark - a great cartographical achievement.Tanner made good use of a large number of intervening map, those of interest here being Humboldt's 'New Spain,' Pike's various maps, Long's map, and 'Pedro Walker's Map of New California.This 1822 map of North America was the progenitor of a long line of famous maps" - Wheat. Contemporary reviews were favorable: A NEW AMERICAN ATLAS "is decidedly one of the most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country" (UNITED STATES GAZETTE, September 1823). Never "has either America or Europe, produced a geographical description of the several States of the Union, so honorable to the Arts, and so creditable to the nation as Tanner's AMERICAN ATLAS" (NATIONAL ADVOCATE, Aug. 25, 1824). The most enthusiastic report came from scholar Jared Sparks, who wrote in the April 1824 issue of the NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW that "as an AMERICAN ATLAS, we believe Mr. Tanner's work to hold a rank far above any other, which has been published." HOWES T29. PHILLIPS ATLASES 1376. RISTOW, pp.154, 193-98 (ref). RUMSEY 2892. SABIN 94319. WHEAT TRANSMISSISSIPPI 350. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 39227

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Buchbeschreibung: [Phiadelphia. 1816]., 1816. Engraved map, engraved by J. Vallance & H. S. Tanner, period hand-coloring in outline, dissected into 40 sections and linen-backed, as issued. Sheet size: 34 x 56 3/4 inches. Very good. In a blue morocco box. First edition, fourth state, of a map of inestimable importance - one which synthesized the best data available at the crucial moment of the opening of American West, and one which, in a sense, envisioned and enabled the 'Manifest Destiny' of the United States. "The cartographic publication that best publicized for the American people the data derived from the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Zebulon Pike's exploration of the southwest in 1806 and 1807 was John Melish's 1816 MAP OF THE UNITED STATES" - Ristow, p.446. Also, much like the Mitchell map of the previous century, the Melish map became the map of record in many important treaties between the United States and Spain, Mexico, and both the Republic and State of Texas. Specifically, the United States-Mexico boundary was laid out on a copy of the map according to the Adams-Onis Treaty signed in Feb. 22, 1819. Martin & Martin write: "Recognizing that the demand for geographical information on the American west was limitless in the foreseeable future, Melish undertook to accumulate a vast amount of descriptions, statistics and maps and in 1816 produced in six sheets his famous map.For the Texas area, Melish relied heavily on the surveys conducted by William Darby, who had personally surveyed much of the Sabine River area.Melish's map significantly improved the descriptions and depictions of the Texas interior, but perhaps its most lasting value to history was its official association with the Adams-Onis Treaty, because Melish's 90th meridian, today the eastern boundary of the Texas Panhandle, was off by approximately ninety miles, controversy and court litigation concerning the correct boundary lasted well beyond Texas's annexation.Of lasting value, too, was the widespread dissemination of new information concerning Texas geography only five years before Stephen F. Austin decided to honor his father's contract with the Mexican government to bring Anglo-American settlers to inhabit this rich new land." The map also played a key role in the development of American mapmaking. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris" - Schwartz. In fact, Melish founded the first company in the United States to deal specifically in maps and geographical works. The map was engraved by arguably the two finest map engravers in the United States at the time, John Vallance and Henry S. Tanner. It set a new standard for clarity and precision in map production. The present copy is the fourth state of the first edition of 1816, as identified by Ristow in A LA CARTE (pp.162-182, the most complete account of the map): a rare early issue of the first edition, prior to Mississippi Territory being divided into the State of Mississippi and Alabama Territory. There are two primary reasons for the great rarity of this map: firstly, Melish only printed 100 copies of each issue to allow him to constantly update the map with the latest geographical information, the second reason is its large size which has ensured a high attrition rate over the past two centuries. It would not be exaggerating to say that Melish's map, the first on a large scale to show the area of the present United States from coast to coast, provided most Americans with their first clear-sighted view of the continental landmass of which the United States was a part. Although the term Manifest Destiny, referring to the inevitability of the growth of the United States across the entire continent, was not current until the 1840s, there can be little doubt that this powerful cartographic image was suggestive of the concept. Such can be gleaned from Thomas Jefferson, who said of th. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 51308

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A New American Atlas containing Maps of: TANNER, H.[enry] S.[chenck]

Buchbeschreibung: H.S. Tanner, Philadelphia, 1823. Folio. (23 7/8 x 16 5/8 inches). Letterpress half-title, 1p. index and 18pp. text. Engraved title with vignette of the "First Landing of Columbus in the New World", 18 fine hand-coloured engraved maps (16 double-page, 2 folding). Expertly bound to style in half-calf over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine gilt and divided into seven compartments by fillets and roll tools, lettered in the second compartment, the others with repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers A fine copy of the first collected edition of "the most distinguished atlas published in the United States during the engraving period" (Ristow). Tanner's New American Atlas contained the most accomplished series of maps of America that had yet appeared in an atlas. Of the greatest importance were the maps of American states. These maps were drawn up using a careful combination of original surveys and the best existing published sources. The evident high cost of production meant that the publishers took the decision to issue the maps in five separate parts which were published from 1819 to 1823. A second revised edition appeared in 1825. The maps, all of which are carefully hand-coloured, include a double-page world map, 4 double-page maps of continents, a map of South America on two joined sheets (numbered 6 and 7 in the index), a map of North America on 4 joined sheets (numbered 8 -11) and 11 double-page maps of the various States. The very large map of North America is of particular beauty and note. Wheat writes: "This map was a landmark - a great cartographical achievement . Tanner made good use of a large number of intervening map, those of interest here being Humboldt's 'New Spain,' Pike's various maps, Long's map, and Pedro Walker's 'Map of New California' . This 1822 map of North America was the progenitor of a long line of famous maps" (Wheat, II: pp. 82-87). Contemporary reviews of the atlas were favourable: the New American Atlas "is decidedly one of the most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country" (United States Gazette, September 1823). Never "has either America or Europe, produced a geographical description of the several States of the Union, so honorable to the Arts, and so creditable to the nation as Tanner's American Atlas." (National Advocate 25 August 1824). Perhaps the most enthusiastic report came from the scholar Jared Sparks who wrote in the April 1824 issue of the North American Review that "as an American Atlas, we believe Mr. Tanner's work to hold a rank far above any other, which has been published." Howes T29; Phillips 1376; cf. Ristow American Maps and Map Makers pp. 154 &193-198; Rumsey 2892; Sabin 94319; Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 350. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 20430

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A New American Atlas containing Maps of: TANNER, H.[enry] S.[chenck]

Buchbeschreibung: H.S. Tanner, Philadelphia, 1825. Folio. (23 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches). Letterpress half-title, 1p. index and 18pp. text. Engraved title with vignette of the "First Landing of Columbus in the New World, 21 fine hand-coloured engraved map sheets (16 maps on 16 double-page sheets; 1 map on one folding sheet; and 1 map on 4 double-page sheets), some expert restoration to corners. Expertly bound to style in half brown straight-grained morocco over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine divided into six compartments by double gilt rules, lettered in the second compartment, the others with repeat decoration in gilt, contained within a modern red morocco-backed cloth box, the spine in seven compartments with raised bands, lettered in the second, the others with repeat tooling in gilt A fine copy of the improved second edition of "one the most magnificent atlases ever published in the United States" (Ristow). Tanner's New American Atlas contained the most accomplished series of maps of America that had yet appeared in an atlas. Of the greatest importance were the maps of American states, which were highly detailed and brilliantly coloured. While New York and Florida each had their own dedicated page, other double-page sheets showcased multiple states at a time. As the title claims, these maps were drawn up using a careful combination of original surveys and the best existing published sources. The evident high cost of production meant that the publishers took the decision to issue the maps originally in five separate parts which were published from 1819 to 1823. A first collected edition was published in 1823, and this second revised edition appeared in 1825. The maps, all of which are carefully hand-coloured, include a world map, 4 maps of continents, a map of South America on a large folding sheet made up from two joined sheets (the index calls for two separate sheets), a map of North America on 4 sheets and 11 double-page maps of the various States. The very large map of North America is of particular beauty and note. Wheat writes: "This map was a landmark - a great cartographical achievement . Tanner made good use of a large number of intervening map, those of interest here being Humboldt's 'New Spain,' Pike's various maps, Long's map, and 'Pedro Walker's Map of New California . This 1822 map of North America was the progenitor of a long line of famous maps" (Wheat, II: pp. 82-87) Contemporary reviews were favourable: the New American Atlas "is decidedly one of the most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country" ( United States Gazette , September 1823). Never "has either America or Europe, produced a geographical description of the several States of the Union, so honorable to the Arts, and so creditable to the nation as Tanner's American Atlas." ( National Advocate 25 August 1824). Perhaps the most enthusiastic report came from the scholar Jared Sparks who wrote in the April 1824 issue of the North American Review that "as an American Atlas, we believe Mr. Tanner's work to hold a rank far above any other, which has been published." This second edition is notable for the significant cartographic changes made by Tanner, reflecting new boundaries, counties, towns and discoveries since the initial maps were published. For example, the map of Illinois shows significant changes to the mapping of the headwaters of the Mississippi, and the map of Louisiana depicts Indian lands with vast changes from the first edition. Howes T29; Phillips 3669; cf. Ristow, American Maps and Map Makers , pp. 193-198; Rumsey 2755; Sabin 94323. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 17477

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MELISH, John (1771-1822)

Verlag: [Philadelphia (1816)

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Buchbeschreibung: [Philadelphia, 1816. Engraved map, engraved by J. Vallance & H. S. Tanner, period hand colouring in outline, dissected into 40 sections and linen-backed, as issued. Housed in a full blue morocco box. The first large-scale map of the United States and a cornerstone map of the American west: first edition, fourth state. A map of inestimable importance - one which synthesized the best data available at the crucial moment of the opening of American West, and one which, in a sense, envisioned and enabled the 'Manifest Destiny' of the United States. "The cartographic publication that best publicized for the American people the data derived from the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Zebulon Pike's exploration of the southwest in 1806 and 1807 was John Melish's 1816 Map of the United States ." (Ristow p.446) Also, much like the Mitchell map of the previous century, the Melish map became the map of record in many important treaties between the United States and Spain, Mexico, and both the Republic and State of Texas. Specifically, the United States-Mexico boundary was laid out on a copy of the map according to the Adams-Onis Treaty signed in February 22, 1819. Martin and Martin write: "Recognizing that the demand for geographical information on the American west was limitless in the foreseeable future, Melish undertook to accumulate a vast amount of descriptions, statistics and maps and in 1816 produced in six sheets his famous map . For the Texas area, Melish relied heavily on the surveys conducted by William Darby, who had personally surveyed much of the Sabine River area . Melish's map significantly improved the descriptions and depictions of the Texas interior, but perhaps its most lasting value to history was its official association with the Adams-Onis Treaty, because Melish's 90th meridian, today the eastern boundary of the Texas Panhandle, was off by approximately ninety miles, controversy and court litigation concerning the correct boundary lasted well beyond Texas's annexation . Of lasting value, too, was the widespread dissemination of new information concerning Texas geography only five years before Stephen F. Austin decided to honor his father's contract with the Mexican government to bring Anglo-American settlers to inhabit this rich new land" (Martin & Martin). The map also played a key role in the development of American mapmaking. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris" (Schwartz). In fact, Melish founded the first company in the United States to deal specifically in maps and geographical works. The map was engraved by arguably the two finest map engravers in the United States at the time, John Vallance and Henry S. Tanner. It set a new standard for clarity and precision in map production. The present copy is the fourth state of the first edition of 1816, as identified by Ristow (in A la carte pp.162-182, the most complete account of the map): a rare early issue of the first edition, prior to Mississippi Territory being divided into the State of Mississippi and Alabama Territory. There are two primary reasons for the great rarity of this map: firstly, Melish only printed 100 copies of each issue to allow him to constantly update the map with the latest geographical information, the second reason is its large size which has ensured a high attrition rate over the past two centuries. It would not be exaggerating to say that Melish's map, the first on a large scale to show the area of the present United States from coast to coast, provided most Americans with their first clear-sighted view of the continental landmass of which the United States was a part. Although the term Manifest Destiny, referring to the inevitability of the growth of the United States across the entire continent, was not current until the 1840s, there can be little doubt that this powerful cartographic image. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 30516

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American Ornithology; or the Natural History of: WILSON, Alexander (1766-1813);

WILSON, Alexander (1766-1813); and Charles Lucian BONAPARTE (1803-1857)

Verlag: published by Bradford & Innskeep, Philadelphia (1814)

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Buchbeschreibung: published by Bradford & Innskeep, Philadelphia, 1814. 9 volumes, imperial quarto. (13 3/4 x 10 5/8 inches). 7pp. list of subscribers at back of vol.IX. 76 hand-coloured engraved plates (two folding), some heightened with gum arabic, all after Wilson, engraved by Alexander Lawson, George Murray, Benjamin Tanner, J. Warnicke and others. [Extra-illustrated with:] An original watercolour of plate 68, attributed to Wilson, depicting a grouping of ducks, on Bristol board. 9 3/4 x 13 1/2 inches, corner's clipped. [And:] The second state of plate 7 [see Jardine's inscription]. [And with:] An additional copy of volume one, i.e. the second issue. Publisher's half red morocco over marbled paper covered boards, flat spine divided into compartments with gilt rules, lettered in the second compartment Provenance: William Bartram (vols. 1-2, inscribed by Wilson on vol. 2 endpaper, "To Mr. William Bartram, from the Author"); William Jardine (vols. 1-2, inscription in vol. 2 detailing provenance [see below]); John Ford (vols. 3-9, signature); Dr. Evan Morton Evans (1870-1955) and his son Daniel Webster Evans (1907-1966) [With:] BONAPARTE, Charles Lucian. American Ornithology; or, the Natural History of Birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson . Philadelphia: Samuel Augustus Mitchell [vol I]; Carey, Lea & Carey [vols II & III]; Carey & Lea [vol IV], 1825-1828-1828-1833. Four volumes, small folio. 27 hand-colored engraved plates by Alexander Lawson (11 after Titian R. Peale, 15 after A. Rider, and 1 after J.J. Audubon and A. Rider). [Extra-illustrated with:] Hand-coloured engraved proof of plate 16, with pencil notes by Bonaparte concerning the colouring. 15 x 10 3/4 inches. [And:] Hand-coloured engraved proof of plate 20, with pencil notes by Bonaparte concerning the colouring. Approximately 10 x 13 1/4 inches, irregularly trimmed. [And:] Autograph letter signed by Bonaparte to John James Audubon, dated 20 January 1836, concerning payments for the elephant folio Birds of America, thanking him for and praising the third volume of the Ornithological Biography, mentioning the possibility of his using Robert Havell as his agent in London, and on various newly-discovered species of birds. 3pp., plus integral address leaf. [And:] Autograph letter signed by Bonaparte, to an unnamed recipient but perhaps Robert Havell Jr., discussing the return of unsold pictures from London to Paris. 1 p. Publisher's half red morocco over marbled paper covered boards. First editions of the most important works on American ornithology before Audubon: with incredible provenance to William Bartram and William Jardine, and with important extra-illustrations including an original watercolour, autograph letters, and proofs of plates. Wilson's Ornithology was the most comprehensive illustrated work on the subject published to its date. In all, the 76 plates depict 320 birds from 278 different species, of which 56 had never before been illustrated. All of the illustrations were after drawings made by the self-taught Wilson, who travelled the country in search of specimens, covering some 10,000 miles through mostly rugged terrain over a seven year period. Much of the hand-colouring of the sets was accomplished by Wilson himself (indeed, during the publication of much of the work, it was his only source of remuneration): "the correct execution of the plates will be rendered more secure, by the constant superintendence of the Author; and by the whole of the colouring being performed in his own room, under his immediate inspection" (Vol. IV, Preface). The work is further notable as among the earliest entirely native colour plate books; i.e. authored in America and printed in America on American paper, using type produced in America, and illustrated with plates engraved in America and hand-coloured in America. In August 1813, during his research for the final volume and before the publication of the penultimate volume, Wilson observed a bird from a distance he believed was a specimen he desired and waded across a river to get a closer look. He die. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 27186

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The voice of truth, containing General Joseph: Smith, Joseph

Buchbeschreibung: printed by John Taylor, Nauvoo, Ill, 1844. First edition, 8vo, pp. 64; woodcut portrait of Smith in military garb in the text; original printed wrappers; uncut, fore-edge ragged, minor loss at fore-edge of wrappers. The wrappers are dated 1845. Crawley 271: "With his name attached to the copyright notice.it seems clear that the book was compiled by W. W. Phelps, who actually wrote most of the contents.The dedicatory poem.dated June 1844, and the fact that Phelps obtained the copyright on June 22 suggest it was put to press shortly before Joseph Smith's death, probably as a piece for his presidential campaign.but his assassination interrupted the printing and the unfinished book lay in the Times and Seasons shop until it was eventually completed as a memorial to him." [Hence, the 1845 date on the wrappers.] The all-important "King Follett funeral discourse, headed Joseph Smith's last Sermon, delivered at the April Conference, 1844, is added in Voice of Truth as an appendix (pp. 59-64). It is not listed on the title page and was not originally intended to be included in the pamphlet, but it is noted on the printed wrapper." Byrd 899; Flake 8000; Graff 3858. Howes S629. Sabin 83288. Crawley locates 9 copies (Yale, Neweberry, Illinois Historical, Harvard, NYPL, Utah, Brigham Young, and the LDS. OCLC adds the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, Southern Illinois University, Community of Christ Library in Missouri, and Princeton. Byrd notes that the University of Kansas City copy has the wrappers. No copies in ABPC back to 1976. The NYPL copy has last 2 pages mutilated and lacks the wrapper; the Newberry copy with a fragment of the wrapper only. The wrappers are rare. Of the dozen or so copies located, it is likely less than a handful retain them. This is significant in that the back wrapper contains the poem "The Cap Stone," a poem in 40 lines, by Phelps. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 48090

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South Carolina Secession Ordinance]:

Verlag: [Charleston, S.C.: Evans and Cogswell, Dec. 18 or 19, 1860]. (1860)

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Buchbeschreibung: [Charleston, S.C.: Evans and Cogswell, Dec. 18 or 19, 1860]., 1860. Broadside, 13 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches. Stained along the left edge. Wrinkles and old folds. Heavily tape-repaired on the verso. Good. In a half morocco box. A very rare draft printing, likely the earliest printing, of the South Carolina Secession Ordinance, apparently printed for the use of the seven-member committee appointed to draft the ordinance by which South Carolina seceded from the Union, precipitating the Civil War. It is thus one of the most important printed documents of the entire Civil War. After Lincoln's election, South Carolina moved vigorously to follow through its threat to secede from the Union. A secession convention was called, and assembled at Charleston on Dec. 17, 1860. Their entire business was to debate the issue of secession, which they favored overwhelmingly, and to settle on the wording of a secession ordinance. The ordinance drafting committee created the present text, and within three days, the 169 members of the Convention voted unanimously for the ordinance. This is the printing of the ordinance that was made for the use of the seven members of the committee appointed to draft the secession ordinance, and is likely its earliest printing. The ordinance is set up in the form of a "slip bill" or "reading bill," familiar to most delegates as the typical form of a legislative bill in working draft, with the body of the text in numbered, double-spaced lines to facilitate the making of corrections. Textually, it is identical to the final draft version of the ordinance as distributed to the members of the full secession convention for their final vote. It differs from that later printing slightly in form however; the present version is printed in a much plainer manner, and does not italicize the title of the ordinance or the preamble, as is found in the later printing. Also, in the title of the ordinance, "America" is hyphenated "Ame-rica," indicating the work of a printer who was not as concerned with aesthetic appeal as they would have been for the final product presented to the full convention. Though without an imprint, this version was likely printed by Evans and Cogswell, who were printers to the secession convention. Following the title, given above, the text reads: "We, the People of the State of South Carolina, in Convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, That the Ordinance adopted by us in Convention, on the twenty-third day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States of America was ratified, and also, all Acts and parts of Acts of the General Assembly of this State, ratifying amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed; and that the union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of 'The United States of America,' is hereby dissolved." Presumably, only a small number of copies would have been printed for the use of the seven-member ordinance drafting committee, and we are aware of only three other copies that have survived. One of those is in the Robert Barnwell Rhett papers at the Charleston Museum, and contains marginal annotations, presumably in Rhett's own hand. Rhett was a member of the secession ordinance drafting committee. There are also copies at Emory University and at the College of Charleston. Parrish & Willingham and Crandall both locate a copy at the Huntington Library, but according to the Huntington Library catalogue their holdings are of two, different, later printings of the secession ordinance. We are not aware of any copies of this first draft printing of the South Carolina Secession Ordinance to appear in the market. By comparison, a copy of the "slip bill" version that was presented to the consideration of the full convention was sold by this firm to the collector, Jay Snider, and reappeared at his auction at Christie's in 2005 where it sold for $66,000. PARRISH & WILLINGHAM 3795. CRANDALL 1888. SABIN 87444 (ref). Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 48421

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Buchbeschreibung: London: T. Harrison and S. Brooke, 1783., 1783. 40; 35; 10; 12pp. Quarto. Contemporary half calf and marbled boards, gilt leather label. Contemporary notation on front pastedown. Negligible foxing. Fine. The four treaties comprising the Peace of Paris (hree Definitive and one Preliminary)which ended the American Revolutionary War and restored peace to Europe. Included here is the first English edition of the vitally important Treaty of Paris between the new United States and Great Britain, preceded only by the Paris edition. Also included are Great Britain's treaties with France, Spain, and the Netherlands, all of great significance for the future of North America. The treaty between the United States and Great Britain (signed Sept. 3, 1783) is a document of seminal importance, marking the end of the American Revolution and the birth of the United States as a recognized and legitimate nation. Peace negotiations between the United States and Great Britain began in Paris on April 12, 1782. The United States was represented by Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, John Adams, and Henry Laurens. While most peace treaties address the issues that sparked the conflict, the treaty between the United States and Great Britain is most concerned with drawing the boundaries of a new nation. The treaty is often imprecisely worded and raised issues that would take decades to resolve. Article One officially recognizes the sovereignty and independence of the United States. The treaty goes on to delimit the boundary between British North America and the United States, from Canada in the north, across the Great Lakes, down the Mississippi River, and southeast to Florida. The people of the United States maintain important fishing rights in Newfoundland and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, and provisions are made to compensate Loyalists for property lost during the conflict. It is also agreed that citizens of both nations would enjoy navigation rights on the Mississippi. The treaty was signed on Sept. 3, 1783 and immediately printed. The U.S.-British treaty was one of several treaties negotiated by Britain during the war, including settlements with the French, Spanish, and Dutch. The treaties between Britain and those states (in the definitive versions, excepting the Dutch) are also included in this volume. In her treaty with France, Great Britain returned St. Lucia to the French, ceded Tobago, and recognized the French claim to the tiny Canadian islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon (still French colonies today) while recovering Dominca, Grenada, St. Kitts, Nevis, and Montserrat in the Caribbean, and Fort St. Jean (i.e. St. John's) in New Brunswick, all seized by the French in the course of the conflict. With regard to Spain, Britain kept Gibraltar while Spain took back Minorca and West Florida (which had been ceded to the English in 1763), and effectively swapped New Providence Island and the rest of the Bahamas to England for East Florida, another "possession" which proved impossible to exploit. Protracted British negotiations with the Dutch over preliminary articles of peace held up the conclusion of the other treaties at Paris. In fact, it was not until a day after the Preliminary Articles of Peace with the Netherlands were finalized on Sept. 2, 1783 that the British signed their definitive treaties with the United States, France, and Spain. In this truce between the British and the Dutch (the definitive treaty was not signed until 1784) it was simply agreed to restore the conquests of each, save for Negapatam, the coastal port which since 1660 had been the principal Dutch possession in the Indian sub-continent and which Great Britain retained. African colonies also changed hands, France keeping Senegal and Goree, and Britain and Gambia. All told, a beautiful contemporary collection of these monumentally important documents, the full legal recognition of the United States. ESTC T53346, T53347, T80895, T53339. AMERICAN CONTROVERSY 83-42, 83-41, 83-47, 83-43. HOWES D212, "aa." CHURCH 1197. Richard B. Morris, Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 50618

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ARROWSMITH, Aaron (1750-1823).

Verlag: London: A. Arrowsmith, 1796, Additions 1802 [but, After 1808]. (1808)

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Buchbeschreibung: London: A. Arrowsmith, 1796, Additions 1802 [but, After 1808]., 1808. Fine folding engraved wall map in four separate sheets mounted on cartographic linen (each 25 x 29 inches), each in 15 sections, with EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND DELICATE ORIGINAL HAND-COLOUR IN FULL, and decorated with a large and fine vignette of Niagara Falls lower right (some light browning and offsetting); original blue paper boards slipcase (quite worn at extremities), title on printed paper label on front cover, and sectional titles on printed labels on verso of each section. Provenance: with the contemporary mapseller's label of C. Smith of the Strand on the verso of one section. AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE EXAMPLE OF ARROWSMITH'S IMPORTANT MAP of America, first issued 1796, this is the second edition with Additions to 1802, third issue with Arrowsmith's address given as "10 Soho Square", and Arrowsmith is now styled "Hydrographer to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales". The 1802 edition is the last of Arrowsmith's large American maps to be issued before the Louisiana Purchase and it is known that Thomas Jefferson ordered himself a copy at about the same time as the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. It is also the edition that Lewis and Clark consulted for their monumental expedition. Arrowsmith's 'Map of the United States of North America' is the most desirable from his well noted career. An acclaimed British cartographer, Aaron Arrowsmith drafted accurate, detailed charts that earned him the titles of Hydrographer to the King of England and Geographer to the Prince of Wales, extremely important distinctions during an era when Britain ruled the waves. One of the first great British cartographers of North America, Arrowsmith introduced a new standard of excellence in mapmaking in the late 18th century and almost single-handedly made London the center for the cartographic trade. Arrowsmith built his great success on this ability to attract both commercial and general viewers through his combination of visual and scientific appeal. The most influential and respected map publisher of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Arrowsmith issued maps that were the result of careful synthesis rather than systematic, scientific inquiry. His role in cartographic production was to gather the best available information from a wide variety of sources, weigh the relative merits of conflicting data, and compile the most accurate depiction possible of an area. Arrowsmith accomplished this synthesis better than any other commercial mapmaker of his day and, as a result, his maps were the most sought after and highly prized on three continents. Stephens 79 (e). Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72map43

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Buchbeschreibung: H. S. Tanner, Philadelphia, 1825. Buchzustand: Very Good. Tanner’s New American Atlas, 1825. Masterpiece of 19th Century American Cartography. Fine example of Tanner’s revised and updated second edition of "one of the most magnificent atlases ever published in the United States," (Walter Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers). Includes splendid four sheet wall map of North America joined for display in original hand color.Condition: Maps in fine condition. Tanner’s maps were scrupulously detailed and updated with latest changes in explorations,state, county and town surveys, (having issued two versions of Tennessee in 1823: one with nine unnamed new counties and the next with those counties named). His attention to geographic detail is matched by his mastery of cartographic design, engraving and choice of coloring. This atlas contains maps of the world, four continents, a large South America, 11 double-page maps of groupings of states, and the magnificent wall map of North America with its handsome title cartouche showing American wildlife. No other atlas of the period has such aesthetic appeal and cartographic significance. *****Marked DO NOT LIST ON WEB****** 3-14-2016 PER PHONE CALL FROM OWNER. book. Buchnummer des Verkäufers B-000022870

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AUDUBON, John James.

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Buchbeschreibung: 0. AUDUBON, John James. The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and their territories. New York & Philadelphia: E.G.Dorsey for J.J.Audubon and [vols.I-V] J.B.Chevalier, [1839-]1840-1844. 7 volumes, octavo (10 1/4 x 6 3/8 inches). Half-titles, 18pp. subscribers' lists. 500 hand-coloured lithographed plates after Audubon by W.E. Hitchcock, R. Trembley and others, printed by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia (plates 1-135, 151-500) or George Endicott of New York (plates 136-150), numerous wood- engraved anatomical figures in text. Expertly bound to style in half black morocco and period marbled paper covered boards, spines with semi-raised double bands in five compartments, ruled in gilt on each band, lettered in gilt, brown endpapers. The first octavo edition of Audubon's Great National Work: a large set, bound from the original parts and exceptionally clean internally. The plates, here accompanied by the text for the first time, were reduced and variously modified from the Havell engravings in the double-elephant folio. Seven new species are figured and seventeen others, previously described in the Ornithological Biography but not illustrated, were also shown for the first time. Audubon may have been prompted to publish the reduced version of his double-elephant folio by the appearance in 1839 of John Kirk Townsend's rival Ornithology of the United States, or, as he writes in the introduction to the present work, he may have succumbed to public demand and his wish that a work similar to his large work should be published but "at such a price, as would enable every student or lover of nature to place it in his Library." The first edition of the octavo work is certainly the most famous and accessible of all the great American colour plate books, and now represents the only realistic opportunity that exists for collectors to own an entire collection of Audubon images in a form that was overseen and approved by the great artist himself. The octavo Birds of America was originally issued in 100 parts, each containing five plates. The whole story of the production of the book, with detailed information about every aspect of the project, is told by Ron Tyler in Audubon's Great National Work (Austin, 1993). The story Tyler tells of the difficulties of production and marketing are revealing of the whole world of col. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 71113

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Amos Dolittle (1754-1832)

Verlag: New Haven

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Buchbeschreibung: New Haven. N/A. Buchzustand: Good. Stipple and line engraving with original hand-coloring. Circa 1791, State # 3. Aging of paper and scattered loss in image and along the bottom legend. Overall a good example. Sheet size: 22 x 18". Inventory#: p427pmat. Perhaps the most important and certainly the rarest of all Washington imprints. Doolittle's work celebrates George Washington's indispensable role in the formation and future success of our nation's federal government. A chain of state seals connected by the Great Seal of the United States encircles Washington, and corresponds to his belief that "our Assemblies in Politics are to be compared to the Wheels of a Clock.if all will do their parts the Machine works easy; but a failure in one disorders the whole, and without the large one.nothing can be done." Engraved in 1788, the plate was altered over the course of eight years with various bibliographic as well as updated versions of the Washington portrait. This third state example shows Washington in full military dress with the arms of Vermont added along with a blank shield on the lower left side. Doolittle played a key role during the American colonies' war for independence and the early years of the new nation. An enterprising printer and engraver in New Haven, Connecticut, he exploited the commercial potential of George Washington's likeness following the 1788 election campaign--the country's first--to create one of the earliest American presidential political prints. Of exceptional size, this work represents a significant achievement in American popular printmaking and marked George Washington's passage from military command to civilian rule. 0. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 000427

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Buchbeschreibung: C. & A. Conrad, et al., Philadelphia, 1810. 8vo (9 x 6 inches). Frontispiece portrait (browned), three folding tables, six engraved maps at the end including five fine folding, of which two are charts of the "Internal Part of Louisiana," one map and one sketch of the "Internal Provinces of New Spain," and a "Map of the Mississippi River from its Source to the Mouth of the Missouri" (only very lightly browned with some minor offsetting, small marginal tear to A2 just crossing the text, first page of Appendix I torn with an early repair). ORIGINAL BLUE PAPER BOARDS, remains of printed paper label on the spine, uncut (spine worn with some loss); modern cloth clamshell box. Provenance: One contemporary marginal annotation to the second appendix of part one; with Dorothy Sloan 15th February 2006, lot 68 AN EXCEPTIONAL COPY IN ORIGINAL BOARDS OF THE FIRST EDITION OF THE FIRST GOVERNMENT EXPLORATION OF THE SOUTHWEST. First edition of the first U.S. government exploration of the Southwest. This edition contains the first appearance in print of the first maps of the Southwest to be based on firsthand exploration. The Louisiana Purchase was one of Thomas Jefferson's crowning achievements, and in the following four years he commissioned a number of expeditions to explore the largely unknown territory. In 1804 Lewis and Clark ventured westward from St. Louis; Sibley, Dunbar and Freeman explored the Spanish border region in Texas; and in 1806 Pike went to explore the southernmost border region north of New Spain. His orders were to explore the Arkansas and Red Rivers, but by February of 1807 he had reached the upper reaches of the Rio Grande having missed the Red River entirely: "Spanish authorities learned of his presence and sent a force to arrest him and his men. They were taken to Santa Fe and then sent on to Chihuahua. Pike's maps and papers were confiscated, but he managed to retain his diary and journals by secreting them in the gun barrels of his men. Apparently he was able to convince the Spaniards that he had entered New Spain by accident, as he was escorted by armed guard through Texas via San Antonio to the Sabine, where he was released. He arrived at Natchioches in June, 1807, having thus had the opportunity to examine New Mexico and Texas in some detail, at the expense of the Spanish government." (Jenkins). "In the hierarchy of significant westward expeditions, that of Lieutenant Zebulon Montgomery Pike (1779-1813) ranks right below that of Lewis and Clark. While his was not the first official reconnaissance of the west, he provided 'the earliest official geographical image of the trans-Mississippi West'. Pike's map and journal.provided the first authentic information about the Upper Mississippi. On the Conejos River, an effluent of the Rio Grande, well into Spanish territory, Pike boldly constructed a fort. It was at this fort that he was arrested and taken first to Santa Fe and then to Chihuahua for a meeting with Don Nemesio Salcedo, the governor of New Spain. The authorities confiscated, among other documents, a manuscript map of the Santa Fe Trail. While in custody of the Spanish, Pike learned 'just how many and what kind of troops the Spanish had on hand to defend the northern provinces,' according to William Goetzmann, 'and he was well informed on the character and personalities of all the Spanish military leaders. No more successful espionage operation has ever been conducted in recorded American history.' Pike returned from captivity without his sketch maps, making the creation of his own map more difficult. He had managed to smuggle traverse tables in the rifle barrels that he and his men were allowed to take with them after being released. These tables enabled him to reconstruct parts of the upper Arkansas, and to his credit, his map is the first to accurately delineate the Arkansas and its tributaries. Nevertheless, large sections of 'A Chart of the Internal Part of Louisiana' (1810), were based on Alexander von Humboldt's map . It is paradoxical that Pike, Buchnummer des Verkäufers 001999

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The Birds of America, From Drawings Made: Audubon, John James

Audubon, John James

Verlag: J. J. Audubon & J. B. Chevalier (Printed by E. G. Dorsey), New York & Philadelphia (1844)

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Buchbeschreibung: J. J. Audubon & J. B. Chevalier (Printed by E. G. Dorsey), New York & Philadelphia, 1844. First Octavo Edition. A lovely set in a solid contemporary binding. Dark brown, half-morocco over marbled boards, matching marbled end-papers and page edges. Pages measure 252 x 165 mm. A few of the inner hinges just starting to split, but bindings are generally holding well. Expert repairs to the inner hinges of volumes 6 and 7; front end paper of volume 7 cracked and secured. Light scattered foxing on some of the tissue guards and pages adjacent to the plates, although the plates themselves do not seem to be affected and are all in lovely shape. Complete with all 500 plates, each with its original tissue guard. Half-titles in volumes 2 - 7. List of subscribers moved forward in volume one, found at the end of the other volumes. The legendary collection of ornithological art, one of the great American color plate books. Audubon was in his mid thirties when he decided to begin the work, and including his field observations it would take over 14 years to finish. Birds of America was originally released in parts in the UK - in large folio size prints, approximately 40 by 29 inches large -- because Audubon, ironically, was not able to find the backers he needed to fund the project in the US and was forced to go to England and the Continent, where the idea of the work was received more enthusiastically. (It would cost today's equivalent of over two million dollars to produce; a massive sum for a book.) Audubon usually painted the birds in watercolors - as opposed to oil paints - and in fact had a very specialized and unique method for posing and drawing his subjects; he would use wires instead of stuffing the birds, as was common. This is partly what contributes to their incredibly rich and lifelike appearance. Less than 150 copies of the original work are known to exist, and of the ten highest prices ever fetched for a printed book, five were for Birds of America. One contemporary reviewer gushed: "All anxieties and fears which overshadowed his work in its beginning had passed away. The prophecies of kind but overprudent friends, who did not understand his self-sustaining energy, had proved untrue; the malicious hope of his enemies, for even the gentle lover of nature has enemies, had been disappointed; he had secured a commanding place in the respect and gratitude of men."Interestingly enough, considering what an American icon his work has become, Audubon was originally from Haiti, of French extraction, but was sent to America at the age of 18 by his father, so that he would be kept safe from the tumult of revolutionary era France. Audubon's interest in nature and art was apparent from an early age, though more practical concerns forced him into business. Soon, however, he would give this up and after becoming an American citizen, spent more and more time on his ornithological interests. It wasn't until his early 40s, however, that he would finally be able to see Birds of America published and acclaimed. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 1669

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AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851)

Verlag: E.G.Dorsey for J.J.Audubon and [vols.I-V] J.B.Chevalier, New York & Philadelphia (1844)

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Buchbeschreibung: E.G.Dorsey for J.J.Audubon and [vols.I-V] J.B.Chevalier, New York & Philadelphia, 1844. 7 volumes, octavo. (10 1/4 x 6 3/8 inches). Half-titles, 18pp. subscribers' lists. 500 hand-coloured lithographed plates after Audubon by W.E. Hitchcock, R. Trembley and others, printed by J.T. Bowen of Philadelphia (plates 1-135, 151-500) or George Endicott of New York (plates 136-150), numerous wood-engraved anatomical figures in text. Expertly bound to style in half black morocco and period marbled paper covered boards, spines with semi-raised double bands in five compartments, ruled in gilt on each band, lettered in gilt, brown endpapers The first octavo edition of Audubon's Great National Work: a large set, bound from the original parts and exceptionally clean internally. The plates, here accompanied by the text for the first time, were reduced and variously modified from the Havell engravings in the double-elephant folio. Seven new species are figured and seventeen others, previously described in the Ornithological Biography but not illustrated, were also shown for the first time. Audubon may have been prompted to publish the reduced version of his double-elephant folio by the appearance in 1839 of John Kirk Townsend's rival Ornithology of the United States , or, as he writes in the introduction to the present work, he may have succumbed to public demand and his wish that a work similar to his large work should be published but "at such a price, as would enable every student or lover of nature to place it in his Library." The first edition of the octavo work is certainly the most famous and accessible of all the great American colour plate books, and now represents the only realistic opportunity that exists for collectors to own an entire collection of Audubon images in a form that was overseen and approved by the great artist himself. The octavo Birds of America was originally issued in 100 parts, each containing five plates. The whole story of the production of the book, with detailed information about every aspect of the project, is told by Ron Tyler in Audubon's Great National Work (Austin, 1993). The story Tyler tells of the difficulties of production and marketing are revealing of the whole world of colour printing in mid-19th-century America. The enormous success of the work was important to Audubon for two main reasons: first, it was a moneymaker, marketed throughout the United States on a scale that the great cost of the original Birds of America had made impossible. Second, by combining a detailed text with careful observations next to his famous images, he offered further proof that he was as good a scientific naturalist as the members of the scientific establishment who had scorned his earlier work. This set an unusually tall set bound from the original part and remarkably clean of any foxing or staining. Among the nicest sets internally which we have ever handled. Bennett p.5; Fries, Appendix A; Nissen IVB 51; Reese Stamped With A National Character 34; Ripley 13; Ron Tyler Audubon's Great National Work (1993) Appendix I; Sabin 2364; Wood p.208; Zimmer p.22. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 30511

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Cantor, Hon

Verlag: Irvington Pub (1970)

ISBN 10: 0891978445 ISBN 13: 9780891978442

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Buchbeschreibung: Irvington Pub, 1970. Hardcover. Buchzustand: New. book. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 0891978445

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Buchbeschreibung: NP, Washington DC, 1946. Hardcover. Buchzustand: g. First edition. A collection of over 500 works from 1836-1979 (with a facsimile from 1826, and later typescripts of works from the 1700's) documenting the relationship between the U.S. Government and American Indians, including: treaties, information and statistics about the tribes, financial affairs between tribes and the government, the establishment of Indian reservations, and legal efforts on behalf of the Indians to enforce terms of the treaties. The collection has two parts:1. Government Section:U.S. government reports, treaties, documents with extremely detailed statistics concerning Native American tribes, and additional primary historical reference and secondary materials, including 108 volumes of Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs (nearly a complete run), Territorial Papers, Indian Affairs Laws and Treaties and more.2. Litigation Section:Collection of legal papers integral to claims filed in the post World War II period by American Indians against the U.S. government for failure to comply with terms of historical treaties, adjudicated by the Indian Claims Court, the U.S. Court of Claims and the Supreme Court of the United States, along with final reports of the Claims Commissioner. Including petitions, legal briefs, findings of fact and thousands of pages of typescript evidentiary documents, primarily court claimant and valuation exhibits, reply briefs, objections to findings, judgments and appeals; Indian Claims Commission Annual Reports.The combination of intensely detailed historical information and litigation documentation provides a profound and comprehensive picture of the changing status of the American Indian in the 19th and 20th centuries. The collection is a valuable source of primary materials that support the study and analysis of America's prejudice and westward expansion policies. Detailed description and finding aids available upon request. Lance Rochmes was a civil rights lawyer extensively involved in Native American legal claims during 1960-1980. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 10810

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Buchbeschreibung: Mostly reprint. Years 1861-1964 (399 volumes). Washington, D.C., 1861-2002. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 09889

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Buchbeschreibung: Lexis Nexis, 2012. Hardcover. Buchzustand: New. book. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 122301553X

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Buchbeschreibung: He acts in his official capacity as Chief Executive under Article II of the U.S. Constitution, which provides that the President Òshall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appointÉÓThe only letter of his to the Senate as a whole, fulfilling this Constitutional role, that we have ever seen; One of the nominees is WashingtonÕs own nephew, son of his sister Betty; The officers served under Gen. Anthony Wayne on the western frontierIn the early 1790s, the western Pennsylvanian frontier was a dangerous place, with white settlers clashing with Native Americans with ever increasing frequency. U.S. military expeditions against these Indians were conducted in 1790 and 1791, culminating in two major defeats at the hands of Chief Little Turtle. General Josiah Harmar lost over 700 killed and wounded at the Battle of the Maumee, and General Arthur St. Clair. General St. Clair, Commander of the U.S. Army in 1791, had his force almost entirely wiped out, losing over 900 of his 1400-man army at the Battle of Wabash. Many of these troops, who had performed poorly, were state militiamen. With perhaps about 1,000 effective and on duty soldiers in the national army left to protect the entire new nation, the United States was in a perilous military position. The Founding Fathers had been suspicious of standing armies, believing that the militia would be suited to all the nation's defensive needs. However, these defeats caused a shift in thinking. At the suggestion of Secretary of War Henry Knox, it was decided to recruit and train a "Legion" - i.e., a force that would combine all land combat arms of the day (cavalry, infantry, artillery) into one efficient unit that would be divisible into stand-alone combined arms teams. On March 5, 1792, Congress agreed with this proposal, and authorized the creation of the first American standing army; however, it would not do so permanently, but only until "the United States shall be at peace with the Indian tribes." Congress authorized President Washington to organize or complete five regiments of infantry, and one each of cavalry and artillery, and gave him broad discretion in doing so. That executive discretion was itself unprecedented. Gen. Anthony Wayne was given control of the new force, and his aide was future President William Henry Harrison. Washington proceeded to name officers for the new legion, and plans for its taking the field were set in motion. Most officer nominees accepted the new posts, but some, such as William Lewis, Hugh Caperton, Baker Davidson, William Lowther, and James Hawkins, declined. Washington nominated men to fill the posts they had declined, but since the U.S. Senate was not in session to confirm the selections, he did so on a temporary basis. Washington wrote Knox on September 15, 1792, saying ÒAs soon as the Waters of the Ohio will permit, General Wayne will forward a respectable detachment from Pittsburgh including those rifle Companies raised on the South Western frontiers of Virginia, to Fort Washington [present day Cincinnati].Ó These rifle companies were commanded by Captains Alexander Gibson, Howell Lewis, Thomas Lewis, and William Preston, three of whom were recipients of these interim appointments.When Congress returned to session, President Washington sent in the nominations for confirmation. Letter signed, Philadelphia, November 19, 1792, to ÒGentlemen of the SenateÓ. ÒÒThe following appointments have been made in the Army of the United States during the recess of the Senate; and I now nominate the following persons to fill the offices annexed to their names respectively.Ó He makes Peter L. Van Allen a lieutenant of artillery; Alexander Gibson, Howell Lewis and William Preston are all named captains in the infantry; and Jonathan Taylor and Andrew Shanklin are each made ensigns in the infantry. The document is notable, and unique in our experience, for Washington dating it not from Philadelphia, where the Federal Government sat at t. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 10917

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Wilkes, Charles:

Verlag: Philadelphia: C. Sherman, 1844-1845. (1845)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: C. Sherman, 1844-1845., 1845. Six volumes: five quarto text volumes plus atlas. Text: Half titles; small format errata slip in Vol. V. Nine double-page maps, sixty-four steel engraved plates, 293 woodcut and steel engraved illustrations (including forty- seven steel-engraved vignettes). Atlas: Five folding maps, one handcolored. Text: Contemporary half calf over marble paper-covered boards, rebacked to style in roan, spines ruled and lettered in gilt, marbled edges. Some light offsetting from plates. Atlas: Contemporary marbled calf, expertly rebacked to style. Corners slightly rubbed. Browned, some expert repairs to map folds. Else very good. All contained within three modern blue morocco-backed cloth boxes, with onlaid red morocco labels tooled in gilt. First edition, mixed issue, of the text: the volumes limited to between seventy-five and 150 copies. The first three volumes of the text are variants of the first edition, first issue (Haskell 1, limited to 100 copies, of which twenty-five were destroyed by fire): the official issue, with Sherman's name on the front of the titles, but a variant with no mention on the half titles that the work was published "by authority of Congress." The fourth and fifth volumes are from the first edition, second (unofficial) issue (Haskell 2A, limited to 150 copies). The atlas (Haskell 17B), from an edition of 1000 copies, was issued to accompany the imperial octavo issue. This set therefore includes elements from the only two quarto issues of this work, allied with the atlas from the subsequent imperial octavo issue. "Wilkes wrote in Jan. 28, 1845, that since general distribution 'would not be accomplished by the one hundred copies ordered by the government of the 4to edition.I have had printed the remainder of the token, (namely 150 copies) of the 4to edition, for the purpose of presentation to my friends, and for sale to those who should desire a book of that size'" - Haskell (p.37). The United States Exploring Expedition "was the first American scientific expedition of any size, charged to 'extend the bounds of Science and promote the acquisition of knowledge,' and was one of the most ambitious Pacific expeditions ever attempted" (Forbes). The expedition represents "the first governmental sponsorship of scientific endeavor and was instrumental in the nation's westward expansion. Specimens gathered by expedition scientists became the foundation collections of the Smithsonian Institution. Significant American contributions in the fields of geology, botany, conchology, anthropology, and linguistics came from the scientific work of the expedition. Wilkes's evaluations of his landfalls influenced later U.S. positions in those areas" (DAB). "The chief fields of exploration in this expedition were the coast of the Antarctic continent, the islands of the Pacific Ocean, and the American northwest coast. In total some 280 islands in the Pacific and adjacent waters and 800 miles of streams and coasts in the Oregon country were surveyed, and 1,600 miles of the coast of Antarctica were charted. After leaving Hampton Roads in 1838, the expedition visited Madeira, the Cape Verde Islands, Brazil, Patagonia, the South Shetland Islands and Peter I Island, Chile, and Peru, before proceeding to the Tuamotu or the low Archipelago, the Samoa Islands, and New South Wales. From Sydney, Wilkes sailed into the region now known as Wilkesland. He visited Tonga, the Fiji group, and the Hawaiian Islands in 1840, and in 1841 explored the west coast of North America. Much valuable information is given on the Columbia River, the Willamette Valley, Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Sacramento Valley, and the findings on the northwest coast of America proved timely in light of the dispute with Great Britain over the Oregon Territory. The Wilkes expedition also visited San Francisco bay and the Sacramento River. Crossing the Pacific, Wilkes called at the Philippine Islands, the Sulu Archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, and, rounding the Cape. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 37086

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Buchbeschreibung: Hartford: Watson & Goodwin, [1778]., 1778. Broadside, 16 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches. Old fold lines. Light wear and separation at some folds. Corners clipped; some light soiling and foxing. Docketed on verso in a contemporary hand. Very good. In a half morocco and cloth box. This Address to the American people, issued by the Continental Congress on May 7, 1778, was read and heard by much of the colonial American population. This moment, when the country's outlook was at its lowest, is a key point in American history. Congress encourages the American people to take heart, arguing that because the cause is just, and the Americans staunch, the United States will prevail. It is the very pivot of the Revolution. The Address was as widely circulated as other key early texts of the Revolution, appearing in nine different broadside editions in May and June of 1778, making it the most widely circulated Congressional proclamation of the war years after the Declaration of Independence itself. In the Spring of 1778 things were looking especially bleak for the fledgling United States. In the fall of 1777 the British had captured Philadelphia, causing the Congress to flee to York, Pennsylvania; Washington and the Continental Army had spent a harrowing winter at Valley Forge; and, the much awaited French alliance had yet to materialize. When news of Franklin's successful negotiation of the Treaty of Alliance arrived at the beginning of May, Congress swiftly ratified it and issued this Address to the nation telling them to take heart. On May 3, 1778, four days prior to the passage of this Address, Congress had unanimously ratified the French treaty. The Address emphasizes that America had sought compromise "with the Earnestness of humble intreaty," having "supplicated a Redress of our Grievances," but to no avail. Now, in the midst of war, "On one side we behold Fraud and Violence labouring in the Service of Despotism; on the other, Virtue and Fortitude supporting and establishing the Rights of human Nature." After denouncing the actions of the British in America at length, the broadside calls for the "strenuous unremitted Exertions" of the populace, proclaiming that "It hath now become morally certain that if we have courage to persevere, we shall establish our Liberties and Independence." The Address goes on to discuss financial and economic matters, both of the nation and the individuals: "They tell you, it is true, that your money is of no value; and your debts so enormous they can never be paid. But we tell you, that if Britain prosecutes the War another campaign, that single campaign will cost her more than we have hitherto expended.It becomes you deeply to reflect on this subject. Is there a country on earth, which hath such resources for the payment of her debts as America? Such an extensive territory? So fertile, so blessed in its climate and productions? Surely there is none.The sweets of a free commerce with every part of the earth will soon reimburse you for all the losses you have sustained. The full tide of wealth will flow in upon your shores, free from the arbitrary impositions of those, whose interest, and whose declared policy it was to check your growth. Your interests will be fostered and nourished by governments that derive their power from your grant, and will therefore be obliged by the influence of cogent necessity, to exert it in your favor." The broadside closes with this bold statement: "Thus shall the power and happiness of these sovereign free and independent states, founded on the virtue of their citizens, increase, extend and endure, until the Almighty shall blot out all the Empires of the Earth." The broadside is signed in type by Henry Laurens as President of Congress, followed by the resolve that it should be read by all ministers of every faith following church service, in order that it reach as wide an audience as possible. The Address was swiftly circulated and printed in nine separate broadside printings in the two months after its issuance on May 7, 177. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 44254

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Buchbeschreibung: Lexis Nexis, U.S.A., 2012. Hardcover. Buchzustand: New. 122301553X New. Decisions of the United States Supreme Court 2011-12 Term / Decisions of the United States Supreme Court By United States Supreme Court (Corporate Author) Product Details Hardcover Publisher: Lexis Nexis (December 2012) Language: English ISBN-10: 122301553X ISBN-13: Buchnummer des Verkäufers Z122301553XZN

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