Beispielbild für diese ISBN

Birds in Literature

Lutwack, Leonard

3 Bewertungen bei GoodReads
ISBN 10: 0813012546 / ISBN 13: 9780813012544
Verlag: University Press of Florida, 1994
Neu Zustand New Hardcover
Verkäufer Book Deals (Lewiston, NY, USA) Anzahl: 1

Bei weiteren Verkäufern erhältlich

Alle  Exemplare dieses Buches anzeigen

Brand New, Unread Copy in Perfect Condition. A+ Customer Service! Summary: Although they are as commonplace as our backyards, birds remain wild, unpossessed by humans, living "beside us, but alone", as Matthew Arnold observes and as Leonard Lutwack explores in this study of the depiction of birds in literature. The very attributes that make birds so familiar - their flight and song - retain an air of mystery that sets them apart from other animals. They appear to exist effortlessly in a state of mixed animal and spiritual being that humans long to attain. This simultaneous familiarity and transcendence gives birds a wide range of meaning in the works that Luwack describes. His examples - both expected and surprising - come in some measure from Greco-Roman writers but primarily from the poetry and prose of American and British writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lutwack divides his material into five sections: birds in poetry and as metaphor, including the classical nightingale and the swan and the birds of such poets as Dickinson, Whitman, and Stevens; birds and the,supernatural, including ancient beliefs in birds as images and disguised gods as well as some interesting modern revivals of bird-gods - the quetzal in Lawrence, the crow in Ted Hughes, and the hawk in Jeffers; birds that are trapped, hunted, or killed in sacrifice, such as Coleridge's albatross, Ibsen's wild duck, Chekhov's seagull, and Kosinski's painted bird; birds and the erotic, with special emphasis on Lawrence's juxtaposition of birds and lovers, the association of white birds with chastity, and the traditional identification of women with docile birds and men with raptors; and a section on literature and the future of birds that includes strategies for dealing with theincreasing threat to real birds posed by humans. Literature has made and must continue to make the reading public sensitive to nature, Lutwack writes, and literary birds may prove to be our best link to it. Buchnummer des Verkäufers ABE_book_new_0813012546

Über diesen Titel:

Inhaltsangabe:

 
Although they are as commonplace as our backyards, birds remain wild, unpossessed by humans, living "beside us, but alone," as Matthew Arnold observes and as Leonard Lutwack explores in this study of the depiction of birds in literature.
 The very attributes that make birds so familiar--their flight and song--retain an air of mystery that sets them apart from other animals.  They appear to exist effortlessly in a state of mixed animal and spiritual being that humans long to attain.  This simultaneous familiarity and transcendence gives birds a wide range of meaning in the works that Lutwack describes.  His examples--both expected and surprising--come in some measure from Greco-Roman writers but primarily from the poetry and prose of American and British writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

 Lutwack divides his material into five sections:  birds in poetry and as metaphor, including the classical nightingale and the swan and the birds of such poets as Dickinson, Whitman, and Stevens; birds and the supernatural, including ancient beliefs in birds as images and disguised gods as well as some interesting modern revivals of bird-gods--the quetzal in Lawrence, the crow in Ted Hughes, and the hawk in Jeffers; birds that are trapped, hunted, or killed in sacrifice, such as Coleridge's albatross, Ibsen's wild duck, Chekhov's seagull, Kosinski's painted bird; birds and the erotic, with special emphasis on Lawrence's juxtaposition of birds and lovers, the association of white birds with chastity, and the traditional identification of women with docile birds and men with raptors; and a section on literature and the future of birds that includes strategies for dealing with the increasing threat to real birds posed by humans. Literature has made and must continue to make the reading public sensitive to nature, Lutwack writes, and literary birds may prove to be our best link to it.  

Inhaltsangabe:

"Is the enlightened general reader, like the Carolina Parakeet, an extinct species now?  If not, the book will find a substantial audience. . . . No one else has dealt with birds in the whole of the Western literary tradition as Lutwack has."--Laurence Avery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


Although they are as commonplace as our backyards, birds remain wild, unpossessed by humans, living "beside us, but alone," as Matthew Arnold observes and as Leonard Lutwack explores in this study of the depiction of birds in literature.
 The very attributes that make birds so familiar--their flight and song--retain an air of mystery that sets them apart from other animals.  They appear to exist effortlessly in a state of mixed animal and spiritual being that humans long to attain.  This simultaneous familiarity and transcendence gives birds a wide range of meaning in the works that Lutwack describes.  His examples--both expected and surprising--come in some measure from Greco-Roman writers but primarily from the poetry and prose of American and British writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

 Lutwack divides his material into five sections:  birds in poetry and as metaphor, including the classical nightingale and the swan and the birds of such poets as Dickinson, Whitman, and Stevens; birds and the supernatural, including ancient beliefs in birds as images and disguised gods as well as some interesting modern revivals of bird-gods--the quetzal in Lawrence, the crow in Ted Hughes, and the hawk in Jeffers; birds that are trapped, hunted, or killed in sacrifice, such as Coleridge's albatross, Ibsen's wild duck, Chekhov's seagull, Kosinski's painted bird; birds and the erotic, with special emphasis on Lawrence's juxtaposition of birds and lovers, the association of white birds with chastity, and the traditional identification of women with docile birds and men with raptors; and a section on literature and the future of birds that includes strategies for dealing with the increasing threat to real birds posed by humans. Literature has made and must continue to make the reading public sensitive to nature, Lutwack writes, and literary birds may prove to be our best link to it.

 

„Über diesen Titel“ kann sich auf eine andere Ausgabe dieses Titels beziehen.

Bibliografische Details

Titel: Birds in Literature

Verlag: University Press of Florida

Erscheinungsdatum: 1994

Einband: Hardcover

Zustand: New

Zahlungsarten

Zahlungsarten, die dieser Verkäufer akzeptiert

Visa Mastercard American Express Carte Bleue


Verkäufer Book Deals
Adresse: Lewiston, NY, USA

AbeBooks Verkäufer seit 7. Mai 2014
Verkäuferbewertung 4 Sterne


Geschäftsbedingungen:

We guarantee the condition of every book as it's described on the AbeBooks web
sites. If you're dissatisfied with your purchase (Incorrect Book/Not as
Described/Damaged) or if the order hasn't arrived, you're eligible for a refund
within 30 days of the estimated delivery date. If you've changed your mind
about a book that you've ordered, please use the Ask bookseller a question link
to contact us and we'll respond within 2 business days.


Versandinformationen:

Shipping costs are based on books weighing 2.2 LB, or 1 KG. If your book order is heavy or oversized, we may contact you to let you know extra shipping is required.

Neu kaufen
Regulärer Preis:
Preis: EUR 67,68 Währung umrechnen
Versand: EUR 0,00 Innerhalb USA Versandziele, Kosten & Dauer
In den Warenkorb legen