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This Book is in Good Condition. Clean Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed. Summary: This is a concise but comprehensive collection of old and mythical tales about Mexico City, one of the biggest cities in the world and the descendant of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. From the preface: " These legends of the City of Mexico are of my finding, not of my making. They are genuine folk-stories. Each one of them is a true folk-growth from some obscure curious or tragical ancient matter that, taking hold upon the popular imagination, has had built up from it among the people a story satisfying to the popular heart.Many of them simply are historical traditions gone wrong: being rooted in substantial facts which have been disguised by the fanciful additions, or distorted by the sheer perversions, of successive generations of narrators through the passing centuries. Others of them have for their kernel some unaccounted-for strange happening that, appealing to the popular mind for an explanation, has been explained variously by various imaginative people of varying degrees of perception and of intelligence: whose diverse elucidations of the same mystery eventually have been patched together into a single story-that betrays its composite origin by the inconsistencies and the discrepancies in which it abounds. A few of them-starting out boldly by exalting some commonplace occurrence into a marvel-practically are cut from the whole cloth. All of them-and most obviously the most incredible of them-have the quality that gives to folk-stories in general their serious value: they reflect accurately the tone of thought, and exhibit more or less clearly the customs and the conditions, of the time to which they belong. Among the older people of the City of Mexico, alike the lettered and the unlettered, they still are cherished with a warm affection and are told with a lively relish-to which is added, among the common people, a lively faith. The too-sophisticated younger generation, unhappily, is neglectful and even scornful of them. Soon, as oral tradition, they will be lost.Most fortunately, the permanent preservation in print of these legends-and of many more of the same sort-long since was assured. Because of the serious meaning that is in them, as side-lights on history and on sociology, they have been collected seriously by learned antiquarians-notably by Don Luis Gonzlez Obregn and by Don Manuel Rivera Cambas-who have searched and sifted them; and who have set forth, so far as it could be discovered, their underlying germs of truth. By the poets-to whom, naturally, they have made a strong appeal-they have been preserved in a way more in keeping with their fanciful essence: as may be seen-again to cite two authors of recognized eminence-in the delightful metrical renderings of many of them by Don Vicente Riva Palacio, and in the round threescore of them that Don Juan de Dios Peza has recast into charming verse. By other writers of distinction, not antiquarians nor poets, various collections of them have been made-of which the best is the sympathetic work of Don Angel R. de Arellano-in a purely popular form. By the playwrights have been made from the more romantic of them-as the legend of Don Juan Manuel-perennially popular plays. By minor writers, in prose and in verse, their tellings and retellings are without end.". Buchnummer des Verkäufers

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Inhaltsangabe: This is a concise but comprehensive collection of old and mythical tales about Mexico City, one of the biggest cities in the world and the descendant of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. From the preface: “ These legends of the City of Mexico are of my finding, not of my making. They are genuine folk-stories. Each one of them is a true folk-growth from some obscure curious or tragical ancient matter that, taking hold upon the popular imagination, has had built up from it among the people a story satisfying to the popular heart. Many of them simply are historical traditions gone wrong: being rooted in substantial facts which have been disguised by the fanciful additions, or distorted by the sheer perversions, of successive generations of narrators through the passing centuries. Others of them have for their kernel some unaccounted-for strange happening that, appealing to the popular mind for an explanation, has been explained variously by various imaginative people of varying degrees of perception and of intelligence: whose diverse elucidations of the same mystery eventually have been patched together into a single story—that betrays its composite origin by the inconsistencies and the discrepancies in which it abounds. A few of them—starting out boldly by exalting some commonplace occurrence into a marvel—practically are cut from the whole cloth. All of them—and most obviously the most incredible of them—have the quality that gives to folk-stories in general their serious value: they reflect accurately the tone of thought, and exhibit more or less clearly the customs and the conditions, of the time to which they belong. Among the older people of the City of Mexico, alike the lettered and the unlettered, they still are cherished with a warm affection and are told with a lively relish—to which is added, among the common people, a lively faith. The too-sophisticated younger generation, unhappily, is neglectful and even scornful of them. Soon, as oral tradition, they will be lost. Most fortunately, the permanent preservation in print of these legends—and of many more of the same sort—long since was assured. Because of the serious meaning that is in them, as side-lights on history and on sociology, they have been collected seriously by learned antiquarians—notably by Don Luis González Obregón and by Don Manuel Rivera Cambas—who have searched and sifted them; and who have set forth, so far as it could be discovered, their underlying germs of truth. By the poets—to whom, naturally, they have made a strong appeal—they have been preserved in a way more in keeping with their fanciful essence: as may be seen—again to cite two authors of recognized eminence—in the delightful metrical renderings of many of them by Don Vicente Riva Palacio, and in the round threescore of them that Don Juan de Dios Peza has recast into charming verse. By other writers of distinction, not antiquarians nor poets, various collections of them have been made—of which the best is the sympathetic work of Don Angel R. de Arellano—in a purely popular form. By the playwrights have been made from the more romantic of them—as the legend of Don Juan Manuel—perennially popular plays. By minor writers, in prose and in verse, their tellings and retellings are without end.”

Review: This collection will make an excellent gift for anyone whose literary interests intersect where Spanish colonial history and horror meet, but it will also illuminate the imaginations of other readers as well--¡Orale! --Charlie Vázquez, Ambiente Magazine

Skeletons avenging their murders with daggers still lodged in their skulls; tales of forbidden love, torture, and vengeance; the eerie tricks played by witches and ghosts--these themes fill these pages with the same hair-raising terror invoked by genre masters such as Edgar Allan Poe (think Poe meets Cervantes meets El Día de los Muertos). I was reminded that this brand of storytelling is nearly gone in our times--harsh realism and sugary fantasy seem to be the poles marking today's literary spectrum. These stories all begin in the realm of possibility and snake their way to the supernatural without getting corny. It makes you wonder how and where they began, and how they changed through the centuries, as each teller's version detoured away from the previous. Great Halloween gift! -- Charlie Vázquez: Latino Musings on Literature

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Buchbeschreibung Createspace, United States, 2014. Paperback. Buchzustand: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. This is a concise but comprehensive collection of old and mythical tales about Mexico City, one of the biggest cities in the world and the descendant of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. From the preface: These legends of the City of Mexico are of my finding, not of my making. They are genuine folk-stories. Each one of them is a true folk-growth from some obscure curious or tragical ancient matter that, taking hold upon the popular imagination, has had built up from it among the people a story satisfying to the popular heart. Many of them simply are historical traditions gone wrong: being rooted in substantial facts which have been disguised by the fanciful additions, or distorted by the sheer perversions, of successive generations of narrators through the passing centuries. Others of them have for their kernel some unaccounted-for strange happening that, appealing to the popular mind for an explanation, has been explained variously by various imaginative people of varying degrees of perception and of intelligence: whose diverse elucidations of the same mystery eventually have been patched together into a single story-that betrays its composite origin by the inconsistencies and the discrepancies in which it abounds. A few of them-starting out boldly by exalting some commonplace occurrence into a marvel-practically are cut from the whole cloth. All of them-and most obviously the most incredible of them-have the quality that gives to folk-stories in general their serious value: they reflect accurately the tone of thought, and exhibit more or less clearly the customs and the conditions, of the time to which they belong. Among the older people of the City of Mexico, alike the lettered and the unlettered, they still are cherished with a warm affection and are told with a lively relish-to which is added, among the common people, a lively faith. The too-sophisticated younger generation, unhappily, is neglectful and even scornful of them. Soon, as oral tradition, they will be lost. Most fortunately, the permanent preservation in print of these legends-and of many more of the same sort-long since was assured. Because of the serious meaning that is in them, as side-lights on history and on sociology, they have been collected seriously by learned antiquarians-notably by Don Luis Gonzalez Obregon and by Don Manuel Rivera Cambas-who have searched and sifted them; and who have set forth, so far as it could be discovered, their underlying germs of truth. By the poets-to whom, naturally, they have made a strong appeal-they have been preserved in a way more in keeping with their fanciful essence: as may be seen-again to cite two authors of recognized eminence-in the delightful metrical renderings of many of them by Don Vicente Riva Palacio, and in the round threescore of them that Don Juan de Dios Peza has recast into charming verse. By other writers of distinction, not antiquarians nor poets, various collections of them have been made-of which the best is the sympathetic work of Don Angel R. de Arellano-in a purely popular form. By the playwrights have been made from the more romantic of them-as the legend of Don Juan Manuel-perennially popular plays. By minor writers, in prose and in verse, their tellings and retellings are without end. Buchnummer des Verkäufers APC9781500897550

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Buchbeschreibung Createspace, United States, 2014. Paperback. Buchzustand: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.This is a concise but comprehensive collection of old and mythical tales about Mexico City, one of the biggest cities in the world and the descendant of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. From the preface: These legends of the City of Mexico are of my finding, not of my making. They are genuine folk-stories. Each one of them is a true folk-growth from some obscure curious or tragical ancient matter that, taking hold upon the popular imagination, has had built up from it among the people a story satisfying to the popular heart. Many of them simply are historical traditions gone wrong: being rooted in substantial facts which have been disguised by the fanciful additions, or distorted by the sheer perversions, of successive generations of narrators through the passing centuries. Others of them have for their kernel some unaccounted-for strange happening that, appealing to the popular mind for an explanation, has been explained variously by various imaginative people of varying degrees of perception and of intelligence: whose diverse elucidations of the same mystery eventually have been patched together into a single story-that betrays its composite origin by the inconsistencies and the discrepancies in which it abounds. A few of them-starting out boldly by exalting some commonplace occurrence into a marvel-practically are cut from the whole cloth. All of them-and most obviously the most incredible of them-have the quality that gives to folk-stories in general their serious value: they reflect accurately the tone of thought, and exhibit more or less clearly the customs and the conditions, of the time to which they belong. Among the older people of the City of Mexico, alike the lettered and the unlettered, they still are cherished with a warm affection and are told with a lively relish-to which is added, among the common people, a lively faith. The too-sophisticated younger generation, unhappily, is neglectful and even scornful of them. Soon, as oral tradition, they will be lost. Most fortunately, the permanent preservation in print of these legends-and of many more of the same sort-long since was assured. Because of the serious meaning that is in them, as side-lights on history and on sociology, they have been collected seriously by learned antiquarians-notably by Don Luis Gonzalez Obregon and by Don Manuel Rivera Cambas-who have searched and sifted them; and who have set forth, so far as it could be discovered, their underlying germs of truth. By the poets-to whom, naturally, they have made a strong appeal-they have been preserved in a way more in keeping with their fanciful essence: as may be seen-again to cite two authors of recognized eminence-in the delightful metrical renderings of many of them by Don Vicente Riva Palacio, and in the round threescore of them that Don Juan de Dios Peza has recast into charming verse. By other writers of distinction, not antiquarians nor poets, various collections of them have been made-of which the best is the sympathetic work of Don Angel R. de Arellano-in a purely popular form. By the playwrights have been made from the more romantic of them-as the legend of Don Juan Manuel-perennially popular plays. By minor writers, in prose and in verse, their tellings and retellings are without end. Buchnummer des Verkäufers APC9781500897550

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Buchbeschreibung Buchzustand: New. This item is Print on Demand - Depending on your location, this item may ship from the US or UK. Buchnummer des Verkäufers POD_9781500897550

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Buchbeschreibung CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. Paperback. Buchzustand: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 50 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.1in.This is a concise but comprehensive collection of old and mythical tales about Mexico City, one of the biggest cities in the world and the descendant of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. From the preface: These legends of the City of Mexico are of my finding, not of my making. They are genuine folk-stories. Each one of them is a true folk-growth from some obscure curious or tragical ancient matter that, taking hold upon the popular imagination, has had built up from it among the people a story satisfying to the popular heart. Many of them simply are historical traditions gone wrong: being rooted in substantial facts which have been disguised by the fanciful additions, or distorted by the sheer perversions, of successive generations of narrators through the passing centuries. Others of them have for their kernel some unaccounted-for strange happening that, appealing to the popular mind for an explanation, has been explained variously by various imaginative people of varying degrees of perception and of intelligence: whose diverse elucidations of the same mystery eventually have been patched together into a single storythat betrays its composite origin by the inconsistencies and the discrepancies in which it abounds. A few of themstarting out boldly by exalting some commonplace occurrence into a marvelpractically are cut from the whole cloth. All of themand most obviously the most incredible of themhave the quality that gives to folk-stories in general their serious value: they reflect accurately the tone of thought, and exhibit more or less clearly the customs and the conditions, of the time to which they belong. Among the older people of the City of Mexico, alike the lettered and the unlettered, they still are cherished with a warm affection and are told with a lively relishto which is added, among the common people, a lively faith. The too-sophisticated younger generation, unhappily, is neglectful and even scornful of them. Soon, as oral tradition, they will be lost. Most fortunately, the permanent preservation in print of these legendsand of many more of the same sortlong since was assured. Because of the serious meaning that is in them, as side-lights on history and on sociology, they have been collected seriously by learned antiquariansnotably by Don Luis Gonzlez Obregn and by Don Manuel Rivera Cambaswho have searched and sifted them; and who have set forth, so far as it could be discovered, their underlying germs of truth. By the poetsto whom, naturally, they have made a strong appealthey have been preserved in a way more in keeping with their fanciful essence: as may be seenagain to cite two authors of recognized eminencein the delightful metrical renderings of many of them by Don Vicente Riva Palacio, and in the round threescore of them that Don Juan de Dios Peza has recast into charming verse. By other writers of distinction, not antiquarians nor poets, various collections of them have been madeof which the best is the sympathetic work of Don Angel R. de Arellanoin a purely popular form. By the playwrights have been made from the more romantic of themas the legend of Don Juan Manuelperennially popular plays. By minor writers, in prose and in verse, their tellings and retellings are without end. This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 9781500897550

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Buchbeschreibung CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Paperback. Buchzustand: Good. Ships with Tracking Number! INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE Shipping available. May not contain Access Codes or Supplements. Buy with confidence, excellent customer service!. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 1500897558

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