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Why Women Are So (Classics in Women's Studies)

Coolidge, Mary Roberts

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ISBN 10: 1591021618 / ISBN 13: 9781591021612
Verlag: Humanity Books, 2004
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Brand New, Unread Copy in Perfect Condition. A+ Customer Service! Summary: Published in 1912, this trenchant yet little-known study is arguably the first introductory text in the field of women's studies. Its author, known as both Mary Roberts Smith and Mary Roberts Coolidge, was the first woman to attain a fulltime academic appointment in sociology. While teaching a variety of sociology courses at Stanford University, she published a major academic study in 1896 called Almshouse Women and also wrote professional articles for the American Journal of Sociology and Publications of the American Statistical Association. Later in her career she published another important sociological study called Chinese Immigration (1909). In Why Women Are So Coolidge broadened her focus to the overall role of women in American society. Her key thesis is that "sex traditions rather than innate sex character have produced what is called 'feminine' as distinguished from womanly behavior." Coolidge was thus a pioneer in exploring the social construction of gender by emphasizing that a woman'ssocial roles should not be defined by her biology. While mothers no doubt would always make a vital contribution to society, she argued that men should not assume that motherhood is woman's only possible contribution. Further, she contended that the reason so few women had till then gone beyond the traditional child-bearing role was that male-dominated society had constrained women throughout their lives by dress, language, and the organization of the marketplace. Looking to the future Coolidge urged society to allow women to assume "wider citizenship, " namely by affording them opportunities of achieving economic, political, and personal liberation. With a very informative introduction andbibliography by University of Nebraska professor of sociology Mary Jo Deegan and an autobiographical essay by Mary Roberts Coolidge, this new edition of a farsighted work by a remarkable and unfortunately neglected early feminis. Buchnummer des Verkäufers ABE_book_new_1591021618

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Published in 1912, this trenchant yet little-known study is arguably the first introductory text in the field of women?s studies. Its author, known as both Mary Roberts Smith and Mary Roberts Coolidge, was the first woman to attain a fulltime academic appointment in sociology. While teaching a variety of sociology courses at Stanford University, she published a major academic study in 1896 called Almshouse Women and also wrote professional articles for the American Journal of Sociology and Publications of the American Statistical Association. Later in her career she published another important sociological study called Chinese Immigration (1909).

In Why Women Are So Coolidge broadened her focus to the overall role of women in American society. Her key thesis is that "sex traditions rather than innate sex character have produced what is called ?feminine? as distinguished from womanly behavior." Coolidge was thus a pioneer in exploring the social construction of gender by emphasizing that a woman?s social roles should not be defined by her biology. While mothers no doubt would always make a vital contribution to society, she argued that men should not assume that motherhood is woman?s only possible contribution. Further, she contended that the reason so few women exceeded the traditional child-bearing role was that male-dominated society had constrained women throughout their lives by dress, language, and the organization of the marketplace, particularly in the nineteenth century. Looking to the future Coolidge urged society to allow women to assume "wider citizenship," namely by affording them opportunities of achieving economic, political, and personal liberation.

With a very informative introduction and bibliography by University of Nebraska professor of sociology Mary Jo Deegan and an autobiographical essay by Mary Roberts Coolidge, this new edition of a farsighted work by a remarkable and unfortunately neglected early feminist will be of great value to anyone interested in the history of women?s rights.

Über den Autor: Mary Elizabeth Burroughs Roberts was born in Kingsbury, Indiana, on October 28, 1860. Her father, Isaac P. Roberts, was a professor and dean of agriculture at Cornell University. Mary Roberts earned her bachelor's degree in 1880 and her master's degree in 1882 at Cornell. She taught economics and history at Wellesley College from 1886 to 1890.

In 1890 Roberts married Albert W. Smith. The couple moved to California in 1894, where he accepted a faculty position and she studied sociology as a graduate student at the new Leland Stanford Jr. University. She earned her doctorate and attained a full-time academic appointment in sociology at Stanford, where she taught a wide range of sociological courses from 1894 to 1903. She published a major study, ALMSHOUSE WOMEN, in 1896, and contributed professional articles to the AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY and the PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMERICAN STATISTICAL ASSOCIATION.

Mary Roberts Smith and her husband divorced in 1903, and she resigned from Stanford for reasons of health. Upon recovering, she accepted the position of director of South Park Settlement -- social settlement that aided the poor, the elderly, women, laborers, and immigrants -- in San Francisco. This institution was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake. That year, Mary Roberts Smith married her former student Dane Coolidge, a writer of ethnographies of cowboys and Western novels. She continued her research and writing, publishing two widely recognized books, CHINESE IMMIGRATION (1909) and WHY WOMEN ARE SO (1912).

In 1918 Mary Roberts Coolidge accepted an academic position at Mills College, where she established the department of sociology and served as its first chair. After her retirement in 1926, she and her husband coauthored THE NAVAJO INDIANS (1930) and THE LAST OF THE SERIS (1939), and she wrote THE RAINMAKER: INDIANS OF ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO (1929).

Mary Roberts Coolidge died on April 13, 1945.

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Bibliografische Details

Titel: Why Women Are So (Classics in Women's ...

Verlag: Humanity Books

Erscheinungsdatum: 2004

Einband: Soft cover

Zustand: New

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