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  • DICKENS, CHARLES & RICHARD HENRY DANA, JR

    Verlag: Boston 3 1/4 pages (9 3/4 by 7 3/4 inches January 31, 1842, 1842

    Anbieter James Pepper Rare Books, Inc., ABAA, Santa Barbara, CA, USA
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    Bewertung: 5 Sterne

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    Original Autograph Letter Signed (ÒRichd. H. Dana Jr.Ó) written to DanaÕs English publisher, Edward Moxon describing the amazingly warm response of Americans to Charles Dickens visiting Boston. An absorbing letter showing DanaÕs wonderful narrative abilities of which more than half is devoted to DanaÕs account of DickensÕs stay in Boston during the English authorÕs celebrated first trip to America in 1842. Moxon was the British publisher of DanaÕs Two Years Before the Mast and the recently issued The SeamanÕs Friend. Ò. We have Dickens here with us, & the whole town is crazy [the author and his wife arrived in Boston from England on 22 January]. I doubt if a literary man ever made such a ÔprogressÕ through a country as he is making through ours. Indeed, I am certain it will be an era in literary history . From the moment the steamer was sighted, up to this hour. The whole community has been in a high fever . he is obliged to refuse all visitors except at certain hours, & then he holds a regular levee. The other day, when he went to sit for his portrait, on coming out, he found the ante room, staircase, etc., lined with people, young & old. One old lady asked him to stand still & let the ladies form a ring round, so that all could see him. This was too much for his risibles, & he laughed out, & told her eager ladyship that he was sorry, etc., but was in a hurry Ñ & was going off; when the ladies called out to the artist, ÔDo, Mr. A. stop him! DonÕt let him go!Õ In the meanwhile the standard men of literature & wealth are paying him every attention, & like him exceedingly . I have met him several times & like him very much. How full of life he is! . He told me much, in the way of answering questions, about yourself, Ô our friend,Õ as you call him, Capt. Ives, & others of whom I was curious to inquire . Dickens has told us many anecdotes of [Charles] Lamb, some of which are not yet published, & which interested us very much. You donÕt know what a feeling there is here about Lamb .Ó BostonÕs adulatory reception of the English writer reached its climax the next day (1 February) with a great banquet held in his honor which Dana also attended. DickensÕs visit to the United States (he returned to England in June) resulted in his American Notes for General Circulation (1842). Written in brown ink on a bifolium of gray paper with small embossed stamp of T. Groom, Boston; address panel, postmark, and remnants of red sealing wax. A rare view of Dickens in America through the eyes of a significant American writer.

  • The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography: Adams, Henry; Henry

    Adams, Henry; Henry Cabot Lodge; James K. Polk; Louisa Catherine Adams; Joshua Johnson; John Quincy Adams II; Charles Francis Adams; Horace Mann; Charles Francis Adams, Jr.; Caleb Cushing; Louis Agassiz; Charles Dickens; Clarence King; Giuseppe Garibaldi; Henry Winter Davis; Richard Hildreth; Horace Gray; Richard Monckton Milnes; William M. Evarts; Lord Lyons; James Mason; George Grote; Samuel Wilberforce; George Canning; Francis Barlow; William Cullen Bryant; Hugh McCulloch; Samuel Gray Ward; Roscoe Conkling; Adam Badeau; Hamilton Fish; James G. Blaine; S. Cox; Frederick Frelinghuysen; Wayne MacVeagh; John Sherman; Edwin L. Godkin; Whitelaw Reid; William Tecumseh Sherman; Sir Char Charles Lyell; John Quincy Adams

    Verlag: Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1918

    Anbieter North Star Rare Books & Manuscripts, Great Barrington, MA, USA
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    Hardcover. Zustand: Fine. Thick 8vo., bound in three quarter dark blue levant morocco, raised bands, lettered in gilt; top edge gilt. Early printing of the trade edition, without date in Roman numerals on copyright page. A stunning copy of a classic of American literature, awarded the Pulitzer Prize posthumously ----- Extra illustrated edition -- Inserted within the text are approximately 80 portrait engravings and 50 documents signed by Henry Adams s circle of associates, including: (page i) Henry Adams, 4-page autograph letter signed (ALS) to C.W. Ernst, April 24, 1894, critiquing HA's "History of the United States"; (viii) Henry Cabot Lodge (HA's close friend), affixed signature; (5) James K. Polk, 1-page document signed; August 7, 1845, regarding a land transaction; (10) Louisa Catherine Adams (HA's grandmother), 1-page ALS, July 8, 1845, regarding a fire at the Adams home; (19) Joshua Johnson (HA's great-grandfather), 3-page document signed, July 1, 1799, regarding a dispute between neighbors; (20) William P. Hunt (JQA's pastor), 1-page ALS to N. Hale, May 9, 1842, regarding a possible story publication; (22) John Quincy Adams II (HA's brother), 1-page ALS to President Andrew Johnson, November 2, 1867, requesting assistance for a friend; (26) Charles Francis Adams (HA's father), 1-page ALS to R. B. Clark, July 10, 1856, demanding payment for services rendered; (34) Horace Mann (HA's hero ), 21-page ALS to G. B. Upton, December 20, 1844, regarding a visit to a school; (41) Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (HA's brother), 2-page ALS, no date (nd), declining a speaking engagement; (50) Caleb Cushing (CFA s diplomatic colleague), 1-page ALS, nd, regarding a lecture; (60) Louis Agassiz (HA's Harvard teacher), 1-page ALS to Franklin B. Sanborn, nd, requesting assistance; (72) Charles Dickens (English novelist whom HA admired), 1-page document signed, June 12, 1866, check; (86) Clarence King (HA's close friend), 1-page ALS, nd, defending a friend against slanderous charges; (90) Giuseppe Garibaldi (HA's hero ), 1-page ALS to George N. Sanders, April 11, 1854, regarding the destiny of Italy and his role; (100) Henry Winter Davis (CFA's political colleague), 1 ½ page ALS, nd, regarding his home, along with a sketch of his garden; (104) Richard Hildreth (CFA's colleague), 1 ½ page ALS to his publisher, March 9, 1855, regarding his "History of the United States"; (108) Horace Gray (HA's law mentor), 1-page ALS, nd, accepting a dinner invitation; (124) Richard Monckton Milnes (HA's English political friend), 1-page ALS, nd, regarding poetry; (136) Benjamin F. Butler (Massachusetts politician disliked by the Adams family), 1-page TLS to O. D. Barrett, August 12, 1887, regarding a weekend visit; (148) William M. Evarts, (secretary of state and HA's friend), 2-page ALS, April 11, 1862, discussing a recent court case; (158) Lord Lyons (British minister to US and CFA's colleague), 3-page ALS to J. Carlisle, March 1961, regarding patents and citizenship; (164) Benjamin F. Butler (Massachusetts politician), 1-page ALS to O. D. Barrett, January 24, 1884, regarding litigation of a paving company; (184) James Mason (Confederate Trent commissioner; CFA's adversary), 1-page ALS, August 29, 1848, regarding a financial settlement; (192) George Grote (Classical historian whom HA admired), 1-page ALS, August 6, 1831, regarding life insurance; (200) Samuel Wilberforce (English bishop with whom HA socialized), 2-page ALS, October 25, 1845, regarding sales of his "History of the Protestant Episcopal Church"; (206) George Canning (British statesman included in HA's "History of the United States"), 2-page ALS; January 6, 1853, regarding a misunderstanding; (210) Francis Barlow (Lawyer-politician in HA's circle), 2-page ALS, nd, regarding a book; (214) Thomas Woolner (HA's English sculptor friend), 1-page ALS to William Gladstone, June 4, 1864, regarding a statue at his studio; (244) (Continued at # ABE-12664270773.). Signed by Author(s).

  • Signed invitation card with holograph entry in: DICKENS, Charles.

    A superb memento of Dickens's theatrical high-water mark, his bravura performance as the "craven and boastful" Captain Bobadil in his own "strictly private" production of Ben Jonson's comedy Every Man in his Humour. The invitation card - in effect a ticket to the performance - carries his characteristic flourished signature on the verso and a holograph entry in his hand, requesting the pleasure of Miss Holskamp's company at the first night, seating her in number 44 in the "Boxes, Second Circle". The success of Dickens's performance is attested by a portrait of him in the role, painted by C. R. Leslie in 1846 and lithographed by Thomas Maguire. The playbill is annotated to give a virtually complete cast list and in this regard may well be unique. "Stimulated after giving a reading of The Chimes to a small audience of friends [at Christmas 1844], [Dickens] resolved to organize some amateur theatricals of his own. Returning from a spell of residence in Italy, 'he flung himself with the passionate fullness of his nature into' gathering a cast and choosing a play. On 20 September 1845, Ben Jonson's Every Man in his Humour was played to a private audience at Miss Kelly's Theatre, 'with a success that out-ran the wildest expectation', as Forster recalled, 'and turned our little enterprise into one of the small sensations of the day'" (V&A Dickens centenary catalogue 1970). The attendee, a Miss Holskamp, was one of four sisters, all born in the Somers Town area of London, near St Pancras. The most likely to have been invited to this performance would be Margaret Holskamp (1827 1908), cited as a correspondent of Kate Dickens by Lillian Nayder in her biography of Dickens's wife: "In May [1846], Catherine's description of their trip [to Italy] was more definitive, particularly in regard to its southern boundary, a line that she herself drew [the Dickenses disagreed about the ultimate destination of their year abroad]. 'We are on the move again,' she wrote Margaret Holskamp, who knew the de la Rues and had discouraged the advances of Augusta [de la Rue]'s brother William" (The Other Dickens: A Life of Catherine Hogarth, 2011, p. 139). The friendship with the de la Rues is a minor but intriguing episode in Dickens's life: "In Genoa [in 1845] and elsewhere he became intensely involved in using, either directly or long-distance, the power of mesmeric healing he discovered in himself to alleviate the condition of Mme de la Rue, an Englishwoman who suffered great distress from hallucinations. This strange intimacy with Mme de la Rue caused Catherine considerable uneasiness, not surprisingly. Dickens's response was righteous indignation (eight years later, when he again met the de la Rues abroad, he wrote home to Catherine admonishing her that he thought it would become her now to write Mme de la Rue a friendly letter, which she obediently did). The Dickens family were back in London in July 1845 and Dickens energetically set about organizing a production of Jonson's Every Man in his Humour to be given by a band of his literary and artistic friends, the Amateur Players. This took place on 21 September [sic] in a private theatre in Dean Street, Dickens's own virtuoso performance as Captain Bobadil winning many plaudits" (ODNB). The playbill is annotated in another hand, listing all performers (bar two minor parts), and this is important as it sheds light on the roles taken by Dickens's siblings and friends: Henry Mayhew as Knowell, Fred Dickens as Edward Knowell, Mark Lemon as Brainworm, Dudley Costello as George Downright, T. J. Thompson as Wellbred, Forster as Kitely, Dickens as Bobadil, Douglas Jerrold as Master Stephen, "Leach" (John Leech) as Master Mathew, Augustus Dickens as Thomas Cash, Percival Leigh as Oliver Cob, Marcus Stone as Justice Clement, Frederick Evans as Roger Formal, "Charles" as William, "Jerrold Jun[io]r" (Blanchard Jerrold) as James, Miss Fortescue as Dame Kitely. "It is important to note that the rest of the cast - Mark Lemon, John Leech, Henry Mayhew, Douglas Jerrold, Gilbert a'Beckett [who appears not to have performed on this first night but is named on the ticket] - came from a specific group, a little band of journalists known as the 'Punch brotherhood' to themselves and as 'those Punch people' to outsiders" (Peter Ackroyd, Dickens, 1990, p. 470). It was an extraordinarily lavish evening at Miss Kelly's Theatre: Jonson's comedy was to be preceded by the overture to Rossini's William Tell and followed by silver-fork novelist Catherine Gore's one-act farce, A Good Night's Rest; or, Two O'Clock in the Morning (a two-hander, the characters being "Mr. Snobbington" and "The Stranger"), which itself was to be preceded by the overture to another Rossini opera, La Gazza Ladra - better known as The Thieving Magpie. Dickens had recently returned from Italy and in Pictures from Italy (published in May 1846) notes several visits to the Carlo Felice theatre in Genoa, where a "second-rate opera company" was performing. It is interesting to speculate that this may have given him the idea of punctuating the theatrical proceedings with Rossini's irresistible music. Both ticket and playbill are from the collection of celebrated bibliophile William E. Self, who formed a fine Dickens library; he recorded that the names of the players was "filled in by Mrs. Charles Dickens" (the items once appearing in the market with a copy of the note, since lost). The fact that Catherine Dickens contributed to the production in some small measure is attested by Lillian Nayder: "Catherine had seen the first performance, at Frances ('Fanny') Kelly's Royalty Theatre, in September, writing many of the invitations herself" (ibid.). In fact, in September 1850 Catherine appeared as Bridget in Jonson's comedy during rehearsals for another performance by Dickens's troupe, scheduled for November at Knebworth House, the home of Edward Bulwer Lytton (an onstage accident prevented her appearance). It is not wholly fanciful.

  • Sketches by Boz (two volume set): Dickens, Charles

    Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: John Macrone, London, 1836

    Anbieter Quintessential Rare Books, LLC, Laguna Hills, CA, USA
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    Hardcover. Zustand: Fine. 1st Edition. First Editions, First Printings of this two volume set. A wonderful copy SIGNED by Charles Dickens on a handwritten letter by Dickens laid into the book. The books are bound in the publisher's original green cloth. The bindings are tight with NO cocking or leaning with minor wear to the edges. The pages are clean with NO writing, marks or bookplates in the books. A superb copy SIGNED by the author. We buy Dickens in the original parts. Signed by Author(s).

  • Autograph letter signed.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: 1 September 1842, 1842

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    Verbandsmitglied: ILAB PBFA

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    Autograph letter signed from Charles Dickens to Thomas C. Grattan (1792-1864), Irish novelist and British consul in Boston, upon Dickens's return from his first trip to America, in total around 200 words in his hand. A bitter Dickens reflects upon his trip, generally seen as unsuccessful following controversies over copyright, and has come back to find that the only change in Britain is an increase in income tax. He is nonetheless friendly, asking to be commended to their mutual friend and to Grattan's family, commenting on the death of a well-known publisher, and wishing him well. Dickens visited America on a six-month tour in 1842, partly as he had always admired the country, and also with the intent of publishing his observations, which were indeed published as American Notes for General Circulation in October 1842. Dickens landed in America in January 1842, welcomed by local dignitaries and cheering crowds, and was lined up with an itinerary including a visit to the White House, meetings with various literary and political figures, and numerous banquets. However, he soon found his literary stardom oppressive, being unable to keep up with the flood of correspondence and overwhelmed by the surge of admirers. It was the issue of copyright which was the greatest blight on the trip. Throughout his publishing career, the lack of effective copyright was Dickens's bugbear. Even within Britain, where he was protected under British copyright law, Dickens found that from the publication of The Pickwick Papers onwards his novels were plagued by unauthorized stage adaptations, piracy, parodies, and "sequels". In America, which had no legal requirement to recognize British copyright or to pay royalties to authors, Dickens was most afflicted with piracy. Dickens's success in America had been as great as in Britain, and his novels - already in 1842 including Barnaby Rudge, The Old Curiosity Shop, Nicholas Nickleby, Oliver Twist, and The Pickwick Papers - had proved bestsellers in various pirated editions, for which Dickens had not received a penny. In his frustration, Dickens sought to use the trip to raise the issue, which he recounts to Grattan, "You will have seen that I have followed up the International copyright question". In two speeches, at public banquets in his honour on 1 February and 8 February, he criticized the lack of an international copyright agreement. The American reaction was instantly negative, with widespread condemnation in the newspapers, partly no doubt fed by publishers who had a vested interest in the continued absence of international copyright agreements, but also reflecting American outrage that their feted author had debased himself with the subject of money, especially at banquets meant for his honour. The press attacks were often blatantly offensive, attacking his character and motives. However, it was one incident which particularly angered Dickens, albeit not surprising him, as he writes to Grattan: "They have forged a letter under my hand in the American papers - which does not surprise me in the least. Nothing but Honesty or common sense would startle me, from such a quarter." On 11 August 1842 (after Dickens had returned to Britain) the New York Tatler published a letter allegedly written by Dickens to the Morning Chronicle in July, full of contempt for his American hosts and for the hospitality he had received. This forgery, for Dickens, was emblematic of the contempt he was facing, further embittering him against the country. "Dickens's romantic dream of America as a pure, free, 'innocent' land, untrammelled by the corrupt institutions and the pernicious snobberies and class hatreds of the Old World, was rapidly turning sour, and he resolved to decline all future invitations of a public nature" (ODNB). Notwithstanding Dickens's bitterness, his letter to Grattan is affable. Born in Dublin, Grattan was initially educated for the law, but turned instead to writing, publishing a few novels, and the travelogue Highways and Byways (1823). He took up residence as British consul in Boston in 1839, and would himself publish a book critical of America, Civilized America, in 1859. Dickens writes to Grattan "let me report that we are all well and happy, as I shall hope to hear you are". He writes concerning the recently deceased publisher Thomas Longman, who had died three days before Dickens's letter: "the older Longman is just dead. He fell from his horse, and never recovered. I have not heard to whom he has bequeathed his valuable collection of authors' skulls", the last line a sardonic comment on the large number of writers whom Longman published, including Coleridge, Southey, Wordsworth, and Scott. Dickens mentions the great English tenor John Braham - "If you should foregather, any of these odd days, with Braham, commend me to him heartily" - which may well be a pointed comment, as Braham had also made a largely unsuccessful trip through America from 1840 to 1842. Maintaining the friendly tone, Dickens asks that he also pass on the commendations "with all manner of remembrance from Mrs. Dickens to Mrs. Grattan - and to your sons and daughter". Though obviously happy to be back in Britain, Dickens's woes were added to upon finding that Robert Peel had instituted a tax on income over £150 a year. He reports back to Grattan: "everybody is cursing the Income Tax, except the men to whom it gives places - and that there is nothing else new in this Hemisphere". Published in The Pilgrim Edition of the Letters of Charles Dickens, vol. III, 1974, p. 317. Folded bifolium (total leaf size 377 x 226 mm), one page of letter text, another of integral address (and note to send by the Great Western, the first regularly scheduled transatlantic steamship), verso blank, two British postmarks: "Ship Letter" and the cancellation stamp "New York Ship, Sept. 18", wax seal. Housed in a custom green half morocco folding box, green cloth sides, spine and front panel lettered in gilt, latter o.

  • Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: Chapman and Hall, London, 1859

    Anbieter Quintessential Rare Books, LLC, Laguna Hills, CA, USA
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    Hardcover. Zustand: Near Fine. 1st Edition. First Edition, First Printing. This is the TRUE FIRST EDITION with the First issue point with page 213 miss-paginated. The publisher's catalog is present and dated November 1859. This copy is SIGNED by Charles Dickens on a laid in check dated 1859, the same year this book was published. A wonderful UNRESTORED copy bound in the ORIGINAL publisher's Red Cloth. The binding is tight with light wear to the boards. The pages are clean with minor discoloration to the endpapers. There is NO writing, marks or bookplates in the book. Overall, a lovely copy of this First Edition SIGNED by the author. We buy Charles Dickens First Editions. Signed by Author(s).

  • Pickwick Papers (Original Parts 20 in 19): Dickens, Charles

    Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: Chapman & Hall, London, 1836

    Anbieter Quintessential Rare Books, LLC, Laguna Hills, CA, USA
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    Soft cover. Zustand: Fine. 1st Edition. First Editions, First Printings in the ORIGINAL MONTHLY PARTS SIGNED by Charles Dickens on a laid in check. A superb set in the publisher's green pictorial wrappers with minor wear to the spines and edges. These ORIGINAL wrappers include 27 additional plates with the rare suppressed plates by R. W. Buss in part 3. A total of 70 plates present, with the 27 additions showing different versions of the original 43, some plates being variants not mentioned in Hatton and Cleaver. "These three artists (Seymour, Buss, "Phiz") etched, in all, 92 plates for the completed work; of which 43 are the "Originals" as they appeared in the first issue of the monthly parts, 4 are "Replacements," 2 are "Substitutes," and 24 are "Duplicates" of the originals: total 73. The remaining 19 are not dealt with in this bibliography" (Hatton and Cleaver pp 17). Fourteen of the front wrappers and twelve of the back wrappers are first issue (the wrappers, like the plates, can be found in a number of variants). The text has issue points in twelve of the nineteen books, in this set two of the parts show first issue text and ten show later issue text. The Pickwick advertiser is present and complete in eleven of the sixteen parts which call for it. The set also retains five of the seven "addresses" that were issued in the course of publication. Back ads present are Parts IX, one ad;, part X, one ad; Part XIII, two ads; Part XIV, one ad; Part XV, seven ads; Part XVII, three ads; Part XVIII, four ads; and Part XIX-XX, four ads. This shows twenty-three of the thirty-four ads called for in Hatton and Cleaver. Not complete as for the advertisements, but still with many more ads here than most copies in recent years. An overall excellent set documenting the progression and development of the illustrated plates and their variations housed in a custom clamshell slipcase for preservation SIGNED by the author. Signed by Author(s).

  • Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: Richard Bentley, London, 1838

    Anbieter Quintessential Rare Books, LLC, Laguna Hills, CA, USA
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    Hardcover. Zustand: Near Fine. 1st Edition. First Edition, First Printing. This book has the First issue point with the 'Fireside' plate and the author credited as 'Boz' to the title page. This copy is SIGNED by Charles Dickens on a laid in envelope. An attractive copy with light wear to the spine and edges. The bindings in all three books are tight, bound in the ORIGINAL publisher's cloth. The pages are clean with light discoloration. There is NO writing, marks or bookplates in the book. Overall, a lovely copy of this (3) Volume First Edition SIGNED by the author. We buy Charles Dickens First Editions. Signed by Author(s).

  • Charles Dickens Signed Portrait Photograph.: Dickens, Charles

    Dickens, Charles

    Anbieter Raptis Rare Books, ABAA/ ILAB, Palm Beach, FL, USA
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    Large oval portrait photograph measures 20 inches by 16 inches. Matted in a contemporary frame which measures 25.5 inches by 29.5 inches. Signed "Charles Dickens (with a large flourish) Boston Sixth March 1868." In 1867, Charles Dickens began his second American reading tour at Boston's Tremont Temple, where an enthusiastic audience delighted in some of his most notable works, members of the audience included legendary literary stars such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Although Dickens was in declining health, he embarked on an ambitious travel schedule across the United States. Dickens returned to Boston once more before concluding his U.S. tour in New York City. When Charles Dickens arrived in Boston on November 19, 1867, the celebrated English author spent several days at the Parker House hotel recuperating from the voyage. As conscientious a performer as he was a writer, Dickens had prepared diligently for his performances, redrafting and memorizing key passages from his books especially for these engagements. He used a book only as a prop; he was so familiar with the material that he could improvise with ease. However, during his 1867-1868 tour he was plagued with Flu-like symptoms, insomnia, and an inflammation of his foot, which forced him to walk with a cane. During his last tours in 1868, Dickens confined much of his performances to the New England area. Dickens was grateful for the income he desperately needed from his readings, which generated $140,000, close to $2,000,000 today; but he longed for home. On April 8, 1868, Dickens gave the last performance of the tour. Prolonged applause followed the reading. He closed by telling the audience, "In this brief life of ours, it is sad to do almost anything for the last time. Ladies and gentlemen, I beg most earnestly, most gratefully, and most affectionately, to bid you, each and all, farewell." He died two years later, having written 14 novels, several of which are considered classics of English literature. A desirable piece of Victorian literary history.     Charles Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the twentieth century critics and scholars had recognized him as a literary genius.

  • Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: Chapman and Hall: London, 1861

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    3 vols. 8 x 5", violet embossed cloth, 344pp, 351pp; 344pp + 32pp publisher's catalogue, covers rubbed, extremities bumped and worn, spines sunned and cocked, hinges loose, vol. 1 eps spotted, contents a bit worn with some finger soiling, ink marks on ffep of vol. 2, vol. 2 rear fly creased else a nice set in a custom gilt-dec golden crushed morocco; cloth case by Bayntun-Riviere (though not stated as such- from a collection of Bayntun-Riviere signed bindings.) FIRST EDITIONS IN THE ORIGINAL CLOTH; volume 3 is a later state with the apostrophe on p. 173, and with period in heading on p. 238, BUT WITH ALL OTHER POINTS AS GIVEN IN THE WALTER E. SMITH BIBLIOGRAPHY INCLUDING THE MAY 1861 PUBLISHER'S CATALOGUE AT REAR OF VOLUME 3.

  • Early autograph letter signed 1841 to the: Dickens, Charles

    Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: June 1841, 1841

    Anbieter N V Books, Alcester, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    Hardcover. Zustand: Near Fine. 'Believe me, my Lord, that I am deeply sensible of this high token, and that I shall ever regard the title with a pride and pleasure much too deep for words.' A letter in which a young Charles Dickens writes from the Royal Hotel, Edinburgh, expressing his gratitude to the Lord Provost of Edinburgh (Sir James Forrest) for the distinguished honour of granting the young novelist the freedom of the city in June 1841. Claire Tomalin writes 'He left an unseasonably cold London to travel north with Catherine, to a warm and enthusiastic welcome. Crowds gathered round their hotel, and over 250 gentlemen attended the public dinner in his honour' ( Charles Dickens, A Life - Viking 2011) 1 page, 7 x 4.5 inches, in excellent, near fine condition, with a main crease through the centre and the remains of a small area of guard to the reverse where it was formerly mounted in a Victorian album. A unique letter displayed in a removable leather frame which is itself housed in a custom full morocco solander box. The box is complete with gilt lettering and a gilt Scottish thistle motif. Signed by Author(s).

  • The Christmas Carol, including 4 other Christmas: Dickens, Charles

    EUR 30.764,00

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    Hardcover. Zustand: Fine. 1st Edition. First Editions, First Printings SIGNED by Charles Dickens on a hand written check laid into the "Christmas Carol" The "Christmas Carol" has the First Issue points with text uncorrected, "Stave I" as first chapter heading, red and blue title-page dated 1843, and blue half-title. All the books are bound in the publisher's original cloth and are in excellent condition. The bindings are tight with NO cocking or leaning with minor wear to the boards. The pages are clean with NO writing, marks or bookplates in the books. A superb 5 volume set SIGNED by the author. Signed by Author(s).

  • The Christmas Books. A Christmas Carol; The: DICKENS, Charles (1812-1870),

    DICKENS, Charles (1812-1870), [LEECH, John; Maclise, D.; DOYLE, R., TENNIEL, John, et al., illustrators]

    Verlag: London: Chapman and Hall, 1843-1848, 1848

    Anbieter Adrian Harrington Ltd, PBFA, ABA, ILAB, Royal Tunbridge Wells, KENT, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    [Festive Ghost Stories] ALL FIRST EDITIONS, each with an associated letter tipped-in. Five volumes, octavo (19 x 13 x 10cm). Publisher's red cloth covers (brown cloth for 'Carol') with gilt blocking and gilt edges. [1] A Christmas Carol: FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE, FIRST STATE, with uncorrected text, scarce yellow endpapers, and title page dated 1843. 'D' of Dickens on stamp to upper board is perfect, conforming to the description of the first impression, first issue binding in Smith (p.27). Also with an associated manuscript letter by Dickens, addressed to a Mr Becker, dated 1856 (published in 'The Pilgrim Edition' of the letters of Charles Dickens, the recipient likely Bernard Henry Becker, writer and journalist for Daily News and a special correspondent in Sheffield, Manchester and Ireland. [2] The Chimes: FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE, with autograph signed letter from the book's illustrator Richard Doyle. [3] Cricket on the Hearth: FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE advertisements at rear. With an autograph signed letter by Lord Francis Jeffrey, a Scottish judge and literary critic and the dedicatee of this volume. [4]The Battle of Life: FIRST EDITION, SECOND STATE title page. With autograph signed letter from the book's illustrator John Leech. [5] The Haunted Man: FIRST EDITION. With autograph signed letter from the book's illustrator John Tenniel. A clean, near fine set (occasional marks to joints where tipped-in, old description to pastedown of 'Carol'), letters with associated folds and creases, cloth generally bright. Each volume in a vintage plain red paper-backed cloth jacket and all housed in an exquisite binocular style pull-off case with full gilt backs. A very clean set, attractively presented with much additional material. Smith, Walter E., Charles Dickens in the Original Cloth, Volume II: The Christmas Books, 2 vols (Los Angeles, CA: Heritage Book Shop, 1982), pp.19-29.

  • INFELICIA: Dickens, Charles. 1812

    Dickens, Charles. 1812 - 1870]. Menken, Adah Isaacs [1835 - 1868]

    Verlag: London - Paris - New York, 1868

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    [5], v, 141, [1] pp. Binder's blanks at front & rear. Frontis of Menken. Facsimile of Dickens' "letter", which is actually comprised of portions from 2 letters Dickens sent Menken [cf. LETTERS, v. 11]. Cuts as head- tailpieces. Sq 12mo. 5-1/2" x 4-1/4" Dickens knew Menken through her 1864 performances at Astley's, during which time she was accepted by the London Bohemian crowd, holding 'literary salons' at her suite at the Westminster Palace Hotel. Her aspirations toward literature resulted in this modest volume of poetry, which she decicated to "Charles Dickens", a gesture the Inimitable accepted with 'great pleasure'. This particular copy comes from a prominent Detroit businessman's collection, gathered in the 1920s, and only now, 100 years later, coming onto the market. Spine sunned to a mellow golden tan. A handsome VG+ copy. Early 20th C. 3/4 green morocco binding with marbled paper boards & eps. TEG. Original publisher's green cloth binding bound-in at rear 1st edition thus (Gimbel B295), i.e., with the lithographic plate reproducing Dicken's letter. This copy SIGNED by Dickens, in blue ink, on the original ffep, "Faithfully yours / Charles Dickens [flourish]". We posit it was signed by Dickens during his 1868 tour of America.

  • Charles Dickens Signed Portrait Photograph.: Dickens, Charles

    Dickens, Charles

    Anbieter Raptis Rare Books, ABAA/ ILAB, Palm Beach, FL, USA
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    Signed "Charles Dickens (with a large flourish) Washington, D.C. Seventh February 1868." Large oval portrait photograph measures 13 inches by 13 inches. Matted in a walnut frame which measures 24 inches by 27 inches. On his Washington tour Dickens met President Andrew Johnson and signed this photograph on the date of that meeting, February 7, which also happened to be Dickens' birthday. He discussed in a letter to his friend and agent John Foster regarding that day, "This scrambling scribblement is resumed this morning, because I have just seen the President: who had sent to me very courteously asking me to make my own appointment. He is a man with a remarkable face." From the Library of The Cosmos Club in Washington, D.C. Portrait photographs of this size signed by Dickens are exceptionally rare, especially with such noted provenance. Charles Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the twentieth century critics and scholars had recognized him as a literary genius.

  • Charles Dickens A.L.S. He Decides to Write: Charles Dickens

    Charles Dickens

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    An extraordinary letter encapsulating the moment of deciding to write A Christmas Carol A fine two-page autograph letter, on the first and third sides of a folded sheet, signed by Dickens, 10th March 1843, to social reformer Thomas Southwood Smith. After corresponding for some time about sanitary conditions for working children in England, and deciding to publish a pamphlet exposing the scandal, Dickens here writes with a change of plan. In full: My Dear Dr. Smith, Don t be frightened when I tell you that since I wrote to you last, reasons have presented themselves for depriving the production of that pamphlet until the end of the year. I am not at liberty to explain them further, just now, but rest assured that when you know them, and see what I do, and where and how, you will certainly feel that a sledge hammer has come down with twenty times the force twenty thousand times the force I could expect gy following out my first idea. When so recently as I wrote to you the other day I had not contemplated the means I shall now, please God, use. But they have been suggested by me, and I have guided myself for their service, as you shall see in due time. f you will allow our tete a tete and projected conversation on this subject, still to come off, I will write to you as soon as I see my way to the end of my month s work. Always faithfully yours, Charles Dickens . An astonishing letter written at the very moment of inspiration to write A Christmas Carol. It is, in fact, well-known that Dickens used Sledge Hammer as his working title for his novel for some time, the purpose of his book being to strike a hammer s blow on behalf of the poor children of England - a firm aim documented quite clearly in this letter.

  • Adventures of Oliver Twist Or, The Parish: Dickens, Charles

    Dickens, Charles

    Verlag: London Bradbury and Evans, 1846

    Anbieter Quintessential Rare Books, LLC, Laguna Hills, CA, USA
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    Soft cover. Zustand: Fine. 1st Edition. First Editions, First Printings bound in the ORIGINAL blue/green wrappers SIGNED by Charles Dickens on a handwritten check laid into the first volume. A beautiful complete set in ten parts that were issued monthly. All the wrappers are ORIGINAL with NO missing pages. The colors on the spines match and have benefitted from some professional restoration. Overall, a wonderful set housed in a custom clamshell slipcase for preservation SIGNED by the author. We buy Charles Dickens First Editions. Signed by Author(s).

  • The Old Curiosity Shop.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1842, 1842

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    Second US edition in book form, inscribed by the author on his first visit to America on the title page: "George Morris from Charles Dickens New York. First June 1842". The recipient was the noted American journalist and poet George Pope Morris (1802-1864), editor and founder of various papers including the New-York Mirror and Ladies' Literary Gazette, which published the writings of many of the best authors of the day including Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, and Dickens himself. Dickens had first met Morris earlier that February, writing to his friend John Forster that at a grand ball in New York he was "waited upon" by Morris "in the full dress uniform of Heaven knows what regiment of militia", most probably in his role as Brigadier-General in the New York State Militia (Letters, Pilgrim Edition, vol. III, p. 71). On 1 June 1842, Dickens inscribed to Morris six known copies of his books, all once offered together in the Rosenbach catalogue of English Literature in November 1913, and since dispersed. Dickens's US visit was by no means successful, as the author was furious at the piracy of his works by American publishers, and his public criticism of their practices led to the condemnation of Dickens by various newspapers. He nonetheless gathered material which he worked into his survey of the country, American Notes, published later that year. The Old Curiosity Shop (which includes Master Humphrey's Clock) was first published in the US in serial form from 1840 to 1841, with the first edition in book form published later in 1841. Provenance: Sotheby's, 24 November 1927, sold to the noted Dickens' collector the Comte Alain de Suzannet (with his bookplate to the front pastedown and inner chemise); sold in his sale at Sotheby's, 22 November 1971, lot 59; sold by J & S Graphics, Inc in their Catalogue number 16, 1973; subsequently in the acclaimed Dickens' collections of Kenyon Starling (bookplate to front pastedown); and William E. Self (ditto), sold in Self's sale at Christie's New York, 4 February 2008, lot 78; and again at the Sotheby's sale of the Lawrence Drizen Charles Dickens Collection, 24 September 2019, lot 78. Smith, Charles Dickens: A Bibliography of His First American Editions, p. 166. Octavo. Original brown cloth, spine lettered with vignette in gilt, covers blocked in blind, plain endpapers. Housed in a custom green half morocco slipcase and chemise. Additional title-page for Master Humphrey's clock, engraved frontispiece, title, and 8 plates after George Cattermole, Hablot K. Browne and Thomas Sibson, numerous woodcut illustrations throughout text. Lightly rubbed, some minor browning, a couple of gatherings a little sprung. A very good copy.

  • The Old Curiosity Shop.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1842, 1842

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    Presentation copy, inscribed by Dickens to William Cullen Bryant (1794-1878), editor of the New York Evening Post and a leading poet of his generation, inscribed by Dickens: "William Cullen Bryant From his friend and admirer Charles Dickens", signed with his characteristic lavish underscores, and with two accompanying autograph letters signed. In the first letter Dickens writes: "With one exception (and that's Irving) you are the man I most wanted to see in America". Dickens excuses himself for not having been able to see Bryant when he called, adding though that "As I lost what I most eagerly longed for, I ask you for your sympathy and not for your forgiveness". He presses Bryant to come and breakfast with him - "I don't call to leave a card at your door before asking you, because I love you too well to be ceremonious with you. I have a thumbed book at home, so well now that it has nothing of you on the back, but one gilt 'B', and the remotest possible traces of a 'y'. My credentials are in my earnest admiration of its beautiful contents". The second letter was the cover note to the gift of six American editions of Dickens's works, all similarly inscribed: "If I had any control over the accompanying books, they should be unillustrated, and in outward appearance more worthy your acceptance." After the delays indicated by the first letter here, Dickens finally met Bryant for their first private audience on his American tour on Tuesday 22 February 1842. Bryant responded to the gift of books by presenting a copy of this own The Fountain and other Poems, his inscription using the same form of words (that copy later in the Stephen H. Wakeman collection, sold American Art Association, April 1924, lot 26, $400). Bryant was well-disposed to Dickens, at that time the most famous living author in the world, but he, like many other Americans, was dismayed by the criticisms Dickens expressed in his American Notes (1842) and in the American chapters of Martin Chuzzlewit (1844). However, he recovered sufficiently to visit Dickens as an old friend on his return to America in 1867. The fact that this is an American edition is evocative: Dickens had strong feelings on the contentious issue of international copyright, and the subject hung over the whole trip. He mentioned it himself several times during his public engagements, eventually drawing on himself the wrath of the American press. Lea and Blanchard (successors to Cary and Lea) were Dickens's "official" American publishers and had prepared for his visit by reprinting his works to date, but the American economy was in the middle of a depression, general fiction could only be sold in the cheapest possible formats, and the cash-strapped publishers were not eager to further erode their profits by paying royalties to foreign authors. Large octavo. Original brown vertical grain cloth, covers blind-stamped, spine with figure and title in gilt (stained, worn), inscribed to Bryant "from his friend and admirer, Charles Dickens". Housed in a quarter morocco solander box by the Chelsea Bindery. With two autograph letters signed to the poet and journalist William Cullen Bryant, Carlton House, New York, 14 and 27 February 1842, together 3 pages, 8vo, the second with later annotation to upper margin. Provenance: by descent from the recipient. Spine expertly repaired, with restoration at head, dampstaining to top edge of contents, boards scuffed and dampstained, foxing throughout, offsetting and oxidisation to plates, as usual with American piracies of this date, overall a good copy.

  • The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: London: Bradbury & Evans, 1848, 1848

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    First edition, presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the half-title "William Haldimand Esquire With the cordial remembrance and regard of Charles Dickens Twenty ninth March 1849". A former director of the Bank of England and a Member of Parliament for Ipswich, William Haldimand (1784-1862) was the brother-in-law of William de Cerjat, one of Dickens's lifelong friends and correspondents. Dickens met Haldimand during his visit to Switzerland in 1846, where Haldimand had retired in 1828. This was a time of some mental frustration for Dickens, and he gained some relief by reading the first number of Dombey and Son to Haldimand and Cerjat. Haldimand's friendship was evidently of some significance to Dickens - he named his seventh child Sydney Smith Haldimand Dickens. The Haunted Man, published on 19 December 1848, was the fifth and final of Dickens's Christmas books. "As soon as he returned from Broadstairs to London, he started work on the Christmas Book he had for so long been contemplating, a book about lost time. The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain is concerned with the power of memory, with family life which is destroyed and replaced only by the wretched anxieties of a distinguished but solitary man. the theme itself revolves around Dickens's belief that memory is a softening and chastening power, that the recollections of old sufferings and old wrongs can be used to touch the heart and elicit sympathy with the sufferings of others. It has been said that in this autobiographical fragment Dickens is only suppressing his feelings of hurt and jealous rage, but it seems more likely that he was actively involved, after Fanny's death, in the process of transcending them" (Ackroyd, p. 553). Provenance: the Comte Alain de Suzannet, with his bookplate to front pastedown (this copy not recorded in the catalogue for the sale of his collection at Sotheby's, 22 November 1971); the collector Michael Sharpe, morocco book-label to front pastedown; the Lawrence Drizen Collection of Charles Dickens. Eckel p. 124; Smith, II, 9, pp. 68-70. Peter Ackroyd, Dickens, 1990. Octavo. Original red cloth, titles and decoration to spine and front cover in gilt, frame stamped in blind to covers, yellow endpapers, gilt edges. Housed in a custom red half morocco box and chemise. Frontispiece, engraved title page, and 15 illustrations in the text, by Leech, Stanfield, Tenniel and Stone. Neat early ownership signature to front free endpaper. Wear at spine and joint ends, top of backstrip loosening, light soiling and rubbing to cloth front hinge starting, initial leaves loosening but stitching holding; still very good copy in the original cloth.

  • Christmas Books.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: London: Chapman and Hall, 1852, 1852

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    First authorized collected edition, presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the inserted blank facing frontispiece, "Agnes Sarah Lawrence, from her affectionate friend Charles Dickens, Twenty Second November 1852". The recipient Agnes Sarah Lawrence (born c.1835, and a young lady at the time of this inscription) was the daughter of John Towers Lawrence of Balsall Heath, near Birmingham. Dickens corresponded with her father in February that year about bringing a group of amateur players to Birmingham. The following Christmas, Dickens returned to Birmingham to give a three-and-a-half-hour reading of A Christmas Carol and The Cricket on the Hearth at the Birmingham Town Hall - the first of his famous readings. Copies for presentation were evidently specially prepared with a heavy text leaf replacing the standard tissue guard. The Gimbel Collection, now at Yale, includes three presentation copies of this edition, each similarly inscribed on an inserted front blank and dated November 1852. Dickens's Christmas books were published here together for the first time, with a new preface by Dickens. This copy was later in the library of the great collector Carrie Estelle Doheny (1875-1958) with her red morocco book label to the front pastedown. Doheny's library in Camarillo, California "represented one of the rarest book libraries in the United States. Within the collection, 4,000 volumes were rare books and first editions. Fifteen hundred of the volumes were comprised of autograph letters and important historical and literary manuscripts. Early vellum manuscripts such as bibles, gospels, commentaries, liturgical works, and ornamented books revealed the prominence of the collection" (Cheung, Encyclopedia of Women in the American West, p. 97). Gimbel D5. Octavo (180 x 118 mm). Contemporary reddish-brown calf, titles in gilt to green calf label to spine, spine elaborately blocked in gilt, frames to covers in gilt and blind, board edges rolled in gilt, book block edges gilt, marbled endpapers, green silk bookmark. Housed in a custom red cloth chemise and red morocco-backed slipcase. Engraved frontispiece by John Leech, text in double columns. Spine professionally refurbished, repair to front joint. Auction cataloguing tipped in at front. Crease to gutter of frontispiece. Slight rubbing to extremities, boards a little marked and scuffed; a very good copy, internally bright.

  • The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1842, 1842

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    Presentation copy, inscribed by Dickens to William Cullen Bryant (1794-1878), editor of the New York Evening Post and a leading poet of his generation: "William Cullen Bryant From his friend and admirer Charles Dickens", signed with his characteristic lavish underscores. Dickens met Bryant for their first private audience on his American tour on Tuesday 22 February 1842 and presented him with a gift of six books, all American editions of his own works. Bryant reciprocated by presenting Dickens a copy of this own The Fountain and other Poems, his inscription using the same form of words (that copy later in the Stephen H. Wakeman collection, sold American Art Association, April 1924, lot 26, $400). Bryant was well-disposed to Dickens, at that time the most famous living author in the world, but he, like many other Americans, was dismayed by the criticisms Dickens expressed in his American Notes (1842) and in the American chapters of Martin Chuzzlewit (1844). However, he recovered sufficiently to visit Dickens as an old friend on his return to America in 1867. The fact that this is an American edition of Dickens's first publishing success is evocative: Dickens had strong feelings on the contentious issue of international copyright, and the subject hung over the whole trip. He mentioned it himself several times during his public engagements, eventually drawing on himself the wrath of the American press. Lea and Blanchard (successors to Cary and Lea) were Dickens's "official" American publishers and had prepared for his visit by reprinting his works to date, but the American economy was in the middle of a depression, general fiction could only be sold in the cheapest possible formats, and the cash-strapped publishers were not eager to further erode their profits by paying royalties to foreign authors. Large octavo. Original brown vertical grain cloth, covers blind-stamped, spine with figure and title in gilt (stained, worn), inscribed to Bryant "from his friend and admirer, Charles Dickens". Housed in a brown quarter morocco solander box by the Chelsea Bindery. Provenance: by descent from the recipient. Substantial dampstaining to top edges of boards, also affecting contents but to a lesser extent, head and tail of spine chipped, wormholes to joints, boards rubbed and scuffed, ring stain to front board, some spotting and oxidisation of plates, sporadic foxing and tanning to text.

  • Pictures from Italy. The Vignette Illustrations on: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: London: published for the author, by Bradbury & Evans, 1846, 1846

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    First edition, presentation copy, inscribed by the author at the head of the half-title, "Thomas Beard Esquire, From his old friend Charles Dickens, Devonshire Terrace, Nineteenth May 1846". The inscription is dated the day after publication. Thomas Beard (1807-1891) was almost the oldest of Dickens's friends, and their friendship was uninterrupted until the novelist's death in 1870. Dickens joined Beard as a reporter on the Morning Chronicle in August 1834 through Beard's recommendation; Beard was best man at his wedding and godfather to his eldest son (Letters of Charles Dickens, eds. Madeleine House & Graham Story, p. 3, vol. 1, 1965). Smith II, 7. Small octavo. Original moderate blue fine-diaper cloth, spine lettered in gilt, spine and covers stamped in blind, pale yellow coated endpapers. Recent custom blue morocco-backed folding case. Title vignette and 3 wood-engraved vignettes in the text. The Suzannet copy, with the engraved bookplate of Alain de Suzannet (Sotheby's, 22 Nov. 1971, lot 87, to J. E. Teale; subsequently resold at Sotheby's, 1984.) Rebacked with original spine laid down, light toning to margins, a very good copy.

  • The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby.: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: London: Chapman and Hall, 1839, 1839

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    First edition, presentation copy from the author to Lady Holland in a publisher's presentation binding of red morocco gilt, together with Dickens's original autograph letter signed accompanying the presentation, two pages, mounted by its last page within the front free endpaper. The presentation letter reads: "In begging you, My Lady Holland, to accept from me a copy of Nickleby in a dress which will wear better than his every-day clothes, I am not influenced by any feeling of vanity or any supposition that you will find in the book, a solitary charm to which you have not already done more than justice. I must not scruple to say that I am actuated by a most selfish feeling, though, for I wish to have the gratification of acknowledging your great kindness, and I do not know how I can better do so than by this poor token; which I venture to send you - not for its own sake (for that would be presumptuous indeed) but simply and solely for the reason I have just mentioned. I beg to be remembered to Lord Holland, and am always, Lady Holland, Faithfully Yours, Charles Dickens. Saturday 9th November 1839." Lady Holland was one of the last great Whig hostesses, central to the brilliant social circle in which Dickens's friend and mentor William Harrison Ainsworth was an accepted literary lion. Dickens had first met Lady Holland on 12 August 1839, she having first checked with Bulwer "if Boz was presentable". After he had visited Holland House that day with Thomas Talfourd, it was agreed that he was socially acceptable. Dickens later corresponded with her when he was in America and relied on her knowledge of Italy when deciding to visit Genoa. Nicholas Nickleby was published in book form on 23 October 1839. "H. K. Browne prepared 39 illustrations for this novel, as well as the cover for the monthly parts, while the portrait frontispiece was engraved by Finden from a painting by Maclise. Because of the large monthly circulation of the parts, Browne etched as many as four plates, in some cases, of each illustration, and all of them were printed in the initial issue of the parts. The first state of the frontispiece and the first four illustrations contain the imprint of Chapman and Hall. The first state of the frontispiece always appears in the monthly parts; the first four illustrations were issued with and without the imprint in the parts, but the plates without imprints did not appear in the earlier issues of the monthly parts, and may, therefore, be termed 'second states'" (Smith I, 5). Eckel pp. 64-5; Smith I, 5. Octavo (208 x 133 mm). Original publisher's presentation binding of red hard-grain morocco gilt, sides with waisted urn on a plinth in gilt surrounded by gilt whorls and spirals, some terminating in small flowers, others with pendents; spine with similar designs enclosing title and author's name, imprint at heel, all in gilt, gilt edges and turn-ins, pale yellow endpapers, gilt edges, unsigned but by James Hayday (1796-1872) for Chapman & Hall, with their name stamp-signed at upper edge of front pastedown. Housed in a red morocco backed folding case. Engraved portrait frontispiece, 39 engraved plates by Phiz, with plain paper guards, all plates except the frontispiece without the imprint of Chapman and Hall. Armorial Holland House bookplate, shelf location added in blue pencil. Some skilful repair to joints, very neat restoration to leather at head of spine with a touch of added gilt, minor oxidisation at plate edges, very good.

  • The Chimes; [together with:] The Cricket on: DICKENS, Charles.

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Verlag: London: Bradbury & Evans, 1845, 1846, & 1846, 1846

    Anbieter Peter Harrington. ABA/ ILAB., London, Vereinigtes Königreich
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    Erstausgabe Signiert

    EUR 120.204,21

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    A superb set of presentation Christmas Books, all three copies presented by Dickens to his friend and theatrical Pickwick, John Pritt Harley, each inscribed by the author at the head of the printed title in blue ink, "J. P. Harley From his friend Charles Dickens". The inscriptions are undated, but almost certainly all three were inscribed together and presented as a group in 1846. This was most likely done during Dickens's lightning return from Lausanne to London in December 1846 to personally supervise the dramatic adaptation of The Battle of Life staged at the Lyceum as a special Christmas bill. The Battle of Life is the first edition (the vignette title in fourth state, as usual), The Chimes the fourth edition, The Cricket on the Hearth the ninth edition. John Pritt Harley (1786-1858), satirically known as "Fat Jack" (he was extremely thin), was a fine actor and countertenor specializing in comic songs. In the 1820s Dickens's sister Fanny had been asked to perform at a benefit for him at the Royal Academy of Music. By the 1830s Harley was stage manager of the St James's Theatre, built by John Braham, where Dickens's first farce The Strange Gentleman was staged. Harley was the dedicatee of Dickens's second theatrical effort, The Village Coquettes, and, on its premiere at the St James's on 6 December 1836, played the leading role which Dickens had written specially for him. Harley later took the leading part in the third Dickens drama, Is She His Wife? at the St James's, and on the same bill played Mr Pickwick, reciting a song written by Dickens on the theme of a whitebait dinner. He was with Dickens's friend W. C. Macready at Covent Garden in 1838, and afterwards with Madame Vestris and Charles Mathews (another Dickens favourite) when they opened the same establishment two years later. Harley habitually took his summer holidays in Broadstairs, where he stayed a street away from Dickens. Harley died penniless in 1858: his estate was administered by one of his creditors. In 1982 these items were acquired by a private collector from the descendants of the Miss Rigden whose book label is on each front pastedown; Miss Rigden presumably acquired the books after Harley's death. One other Dickens presentation to Harley is recorded: the Starling-Suzannet-Self copy of The Village Coquettes, which sold in April 2008 for $32,200 - though a second dedication copy of the same title, from the Jerome Kern collection sold in 1929, is now in the Gimbel collection at Yale. Smith II: 5, 6, 8. Together 3 works, small octavo. Original red cloth, spines and front covers lettered and decorated in gilt, covers stamped in blind, yellow endpapers, gilt edges. Housed in a red morocco-backed folding case. Expert restoration to spine ends and joints, spines a little darkened, slight foxing to engraved titles of The Chimes but contents generally clean; a very good set.