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A Greek and English Lexicon; adapted to: Pickering, John

Pickering, John

Verlag: Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins (1829)

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Buchbeschreibung: Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins, 1829. Hardcover. Buchzustand: Good. 2nd Edition. The signature is an early one – somewhere around 22 years of age. Thoreau had studied Greek and the classics at Harvard, graduating in 1837 and began translating Aeschylus in his journal circa 1839 - his translation of Prometheus Bound would appear in the third installment of The Dial magazine in 1843. This is a young Thoreau still developing as a man and an intellectual – obviously using this book heavily, as it contains lengthy annotations on 16 pages – his additions of Greek words with definitions. ******************* Condition – good. Preliminary leaves lacking, front cover replaced by a later cloth and contemporary leather hybrid – but it’s a sturdy book(unlike most rare books, you can set aside your paranoia in handling this one. Go ahead and have a pizza, then kick back with Thoreau) and the annotations are in bold ink. It was gifted in 1874 by his devoted sister, Sophia, to the Concord Library and later acquired by superstar collector Stephen Wakeman(according to the documented history of the book). The book doesn’t need any trinkets of imaginative dressing from me, but to go full bore, it’s more than conceivable that he brought this along to Walden Pond along with other pieces from his library. ************* Wakeman was amongst the greatest collectors of all time – in a golden era of bad and boujee collectors that continuously one-upped each other by gobbling up the choicest pieces. He was the OG Thoreau collector, amassing the largest, most comprehensive assortment of HDT stuff, even a bookshelf made by HDT – that’s next level. If you’re a book collecting nerd with an interest in American literary icons, pick up some auction catalogs from the turn of the century – inscribed rarities from the greats would appear like it was another ho hum day at the office. It’s heady stuff.*********** It’s the 200th anniversary of this icon’s birth. I won’t ramble about his legend – we’re all aware. What is pertinent to convey is that pieces like this will continue to be more impossible to procure the longer time expands the void between us and him. One hundred fifty stacks is significant, but the big institutions will continue to inter these pieces - leaving the collecting public out in the cold. You can pick up nice copies of HDT’s books at anytime, even fragments of his manuscript leaves – many of which have no lofty significance. This piece does have such significance(a book heavily used by a legend to shape his mind is pretty lofty) and now is your shooting star-esque window of time to own a museum piece. Buchnummer des Verkäufers ABE-1490346451007

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A Greek and English Lexicon; adapted to: Thoreau, Henry David

Thoreau, Henry David (John Pickering)

Verlag: Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins (1829)

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Buchbeschreibung: Hilliard, Gray, Little and Wilkins, 1829. Hardcover. Buchzustand: Good. 2nd Edition. The signature is an early one – somewhere around 22 years of age. Thoreau had studied Greek and the classics at Harvard, graduating in 1837 and began translating Aeschylus in his journal circa 1839 - his translation of Prometheus Bound would appear in the third installment of The Dial magazine in 1843. This is a young Thoreau still developing as a man and an intellectual – obviously using this book heavily, as it contains lengthy annotations on 16 pages – his additions of Greek words with definitions. ******************* Condition – good. Preliminary leaves lacking, front cover replaced by a later cloth and contemporary leather hybrid – but it’s a sturdy book(unlike most rare books, you can set aside your paranoia in handling this one. Go ahead and have a pizza, then kick back with Thoreau) and the annotations are in bold ink. It was gifted in 1874 by his devoted sister, Sophia, to the Concord Library and later acquired by superstar collector Stephen Wakeman(according to the documented history of the book). The book doesn’t need any trinkets of imaginative dressing from me, but to go full bore, it’s more than conceivable that he brought this along to Walden Pond along with other pieces from his library. ************* Wakeman was amongst the greatest collectors of all time – in a golden era of bad and boujee collectors that continuously one-upped each other by gobbling up the choicest pieces. He was the OG Thoreau collector, amassing the largest, most comprehensive assortment of HDT stuff, even a bookshelf made by HDT – that’s next level. If you’re a book collecting nerd with an interest in American literary icons, pick up some auction catalogs from the turn of the century – inscribed rarities from the greats would appear like it was another ho hum day at the office. It’s heady stuff.*********** It’s the 200th anniversary of this icon’s birth. I won’t ramble about his legend – we’re all aware. What is pertinent to convey is that pieces like this will continue to be more impossible to procure the longer time expands the void between us and him. One hundred fifty stacks is significant, but the big institutions will continue to inter these pieces - leaving the collecting public out in the cold. You can pick up nice copies of HDT’s books at anytime, even fragments of his manuscript leaves – many of which have no lofty significance. This piece does have such significance(a book heavily used by a legend to shape his mind is pretty lofty) and now is your shooting star-esque window of time to own a museum piece. Buchnummer des Verkäufers ABE-1490346566184

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AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851).

Verlag: Philadelphia: J. B. Chevalier, [1839-] 1840-1844. (1844)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: J. B. Chevalier, [1839-] 1840-1844., 1844. 7 volumes. 8vo., (10 1/8 x 6 4/8 inches). Half-titles, subscribers' lists at end of each volume. 500 hand-colored lithographed plates after Audubon by W.E. Hitchcock, R. Trembly and others, printed and colored by J.T. Bowen, wood-engraved anatomical diagrams in text (intermittent offsetting and spotting, particularly to the tissue guards and corresponding text leaves at the beginning and end of each volume). Original publisher's deluxe binding of maroon morocco gilt, elaborately decorated in gilt (extremities a bit rubbed). The first octavo edition of John James Audubon's masterpiece, a tall copy with colors very clean and fresh. Audubon created 65 new images for the octavo edition, supplementing the original 435 of the double-elephant folio edition of 1827-1838. The resulting series of 500 plates constitutes the most extensive American color-plate book produced up to that time. The Philadelphia printer J.T. Bowen reduced the double-elephant plates by camera lucida and the resulting lithographs show significant changes in the backgrounds and compositions. The original configurations of the elephant folio were altered so that only one species is depicted per plate. The text revision of the 'Ornithological Biography' was rearranged according to Audubon's "A Synopsis of the Birds of North America" (1839). "The genesis of Audubon's career as a painter may be said to have taken place in 1810, when the Scots-American ornithologist Alexander Wilson stopped in Henderson to seek subscriptions for his 'American Ornithology'. Audubon was approving of Wilson's efforts and was prepared to subscribe when his partner Rozier intervened. Rozier pointed out that the partners lacked the discretionary funds for such an investment and also suggested that Audubon was much the superior artist. Wilson departed without the hoped-for subscription. Not until 1820, however, when he was thirty-five and after years of disappointment in business, did Audubon conclude that he wanted to publish an ambitious folio of all American birds. Accompanying him on the first of several collecting and painting trips was young Joseph Mason, the first of several associates who later would paint at least fifty backgrounds for Audubon's bird plates. Following this trip, Audubon spent some months in New Orleans making a modest living sketching portraits and then as tutor to Eliza Pirrie at the plantation owned by the latter's father on Bayou Sara. Throughout, he gradually began accumulating his bird pictures. "A trip to Philadelphia in 1824 to look into the possibilities of publication and other support was a disaster. Audubon foolishly antagonized the artist Titian Peale and the engraver Alexander Lawson, who were preparing illustrations for Charles Lucien Bonaparte's 'American Ornithology; or, The Natural History of Birds Inhabiting the United States, Not Given by Wilson'. With his criticisms of Wilson's artistry, he also infuriated the Philadelphia businessman and naturalist George Ord, Wilson's friend, editor, biographer, and champion, who became Audubon's lifelong enemy and did whatever he could to block Audubon's success in the United States. Following Ord's lead, most Philadelphia naturalists and engravers refused to assist Audubon with his project. Audubon now concluded that he had no choice but to go to Europe to seek out engravers and printers, and this he did with money he and Lucy earned from teaching the children of the Percy family of Beechwood Plantation near New Orleans in 1825 and early 1826. "Arriving in Liverpool, England, in July 1826, Audubon soon found the support and fame that had so long eluded him in the United States. He went on to Manchester, where the response to his work was tepid, and then to Edinburgh, Scotland, where he found not only more support but William H. Lizars, the engraver he had been looking for. There he matured his ideas concerning his project and decided on an elephant folio on a subscription basis. He took time to fulfill a long. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72nhr129

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Military Bridges: with suggestions of new expedients: LINCOLN, Abraham.) HAUPT,
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Buchbeschreibung: New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1864, 1864. Octavo. Original red vertical-grain cloth, gilt lettered spine, blind panelling on sides. Housed in a custom-made dark blue morocco pull-of case by H. Zucker of Philadelphia. From the library of John Gribbel (1858-1936), American businessman, industrialist and philanthropist, best known for his donation of the Roberts Burns Glenriddell Manuscripts to the National Library of Scotland, with his Burns bookplate; Gribbel had a particular interest in American Colonial historical documents and gave an address concerning Lincoln to the annual dinner of the Union League in February 1915. Spine of case sunned, some wear and a few old repairs to binding, paper refurbishment to inner joints, scattered foxing to plates. Wood-engraved frontispiece & 69 lithograph diagrammatic plates (many folding). First edition. A remarkable presentation copy: firstly, from the publisher to President Lincoln, inscribed in a secretarial hand on a blank before the frontispiece: "A. Lincoln, President of the U. S. with the compliments of D. Van Nostrand"; in the 1830s David Van Nostrand was clerk of accounts and disbursements under Captain (later General) John G. Barnard – future chief engineer to the Army of the Potomac – and later played a significant part in the importation of military titles for officers of the Union Army. Secondly, inscribed by Lincoln below Van Nostrand's inscription: "Presented to Gen. J. B. S. Todd by A. Lincoln, July 14. 1864". John Blair Smith Todd (1814-1872) was first cousin to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, a lawyer, and a delegate from Dakota Territory to the House of Representatives. He had extensive military experience, graduating from West Point in 1837, then serving in the Second Seminole War from 1837-40, the Mexican-American War of 1847, and finally garrison and frontier duty against the Sioux. Todd first came to Dakota in 1855 as a topographer for an expedition under General William Selby. When the Civil War broke out he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers with command of the North Missouri district, serving for three months from 15 October until 1 December 1861. Missouri, although a border state in the Civil War, was something of a backwater. Todd resigned from the army on 17 July 1862 and returned to politics. Therefore, an accompanying note that states "Gen Toder [sic] carried this in his saddle bag" would seem to be somewhat fanciful. Todd was one of the five relatives and family friends who were officially appointed to accompany Lincoln's funeral train from Washington to Springfield, Illinois. "Two of the Todd cousins also took their places [at the White House, as invited mourners] with Robert Lincoln – Dr. Lyman Beecher Todd and General John Blair Smith Todd, both highly regarded by the Lincolns because, when so many Todds had given their allegiance to the Confederacy [JBS Todd was a Kentuckian], these two men had remained loyal to the Union" (Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body, Harvard University Press, 2007, p. 13). It has also been pointed out that "one senses a genuine respect for him [Todd] in Lincoln's correspondence Moreover, the President gave him an assignment, too. Lincoln told the secretary of war on the eve of Todd's departure [from Washington to Dakota], 'Capt. Todd leaves for the West tomorrow afternoon; and, being an experienced military man, would bear and deliver any dispatches confided to him' he did not resign [his military position] until mid-July 1862, by which time he was commanding the Sixth Division of the Army Corps of the Tennessee, under Ulysses S. Grant" (Neely & Holzer, The Lincoln Family Album, 2006, pp. 5-6). Lincoln's inscription dates to just two days after Confederate troops, under Jubal Early, had bombarded the defenses of Washington; 14 July itself saw a Union victory against Bedford Forrest at Tupelo, Mississippi, a significant success in which Confederate forces were kept away from Union railroads in Tennessee, securing the supply lines to Sherman's f. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 118758

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Buchbeschreibung: Privately printed at the Lockwood Press, New York, 1898. Hardcover. Buchzustand: Near Fine. 1st Edition. ONE OF THE RAREST BOOKS TO BE FOUND ON THE CIVIL WAR. ELEPHANT FOLIO. The very few copies of these lithographs are usually found as loose sheets in a solander or clam shell case. This book seems to be the only known bound copy. Original dark blue half calf with blue cloth boards. Gilt title to the front board. The full stamping reads as the following."General's of the Confederate States Army 1861-1865. Presented to the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the City of New York by Charles B. Hall." Gilt title and library call number in gilt to the spine. Gilt ruled lines to the border of the leather corners and outside edges of the leather spine. All page edges dyed red. There is however fading to the top page edges. (The binding's leather, cloth and titling style are replicated from that of the clam shell case). Original pastedowns and endpapers. The pages have been trimmed approximately one inch and a quarter in order to fit the binding. The format of the book is as follows. A PRESENTATION LETTER ON PATRIOTIC LETTERHEAD LAID IN ON THE FFEP AND SIGNED BY HALL TO THE GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN. ( ANYTHING SIGNED BY HALL WOULD IN ITSELF WOULD BE VERY RARE). Confederate flag page. Title page. Copyright page 1898 by Charles B. Hall. Foreword. Table of Contents for Generals. Table of Contents for Lieutenant Generals. Table of Contents for Major Generals. One hundred and eight magnificent tissue guarded black and white lithographs with a separate page of descriptive narrative for each of the General's. I have consulted a Civil War pricing guide, which states that these lithographs are "SUPERLATIVELY RARE, ALMOST UNOBTAINABLE. OCLC locates a few copies of this first edition held in university libraries. This set of lithographs rarely appear on the market and would seem to be an excellent investment. A true museum piece or acquisition for an institutional rare book library. Should you have questions please email or call me. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY. THANK YOU. Size: 12.5" x 16.0" Language: eng. Signed by Author(s). Buchnummer des Verkäufers 010374

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Buchbeschreibung: Paris. Dec. 24, 1784., 1784. [3]pp. with integral address leaf addressed in Jefferson's hand. Original mailing folds, a few minor marginal tears, including minor marginal paper loss from opening of the wax seal, repaired. Blind stamp of the Chastellux Archives in upper margin of first leaf. Very good. Wax seal still present. In a half morocco box. An outstanding letter from Thomas Jefferson to Chastellux, praising the author for "The most flattering account of America that had ever been written." Jefferson was living in Paris at the time, succeeding Benjamin Franklin as minister to France. His main task was the negotiation of trade agreements with France for the Congress of the Confederation. Chastellux served as a Major General in the French army under Rochambeau, and travelled widely in America from 1780 to 1783. Howes calls the narrative of Chastellux's time in America, which he eventually published in its complete form in 1786, "The first trustworthy record of life in the United States." After the war, he remained in friendly communication with many vital figures of the Revolution and the early United States, including Jefferson and George Washington. As Jefferson writes this letter to him, Chastellux is again living in Paris, at the Hotel Quai d'Orsay. The thrust of Jefferson's letter is a tactful confrontation of the troublesome nature of certain passages in Chastellux’s privately printed VOYAGE DE NEWPORT A PHILADELPHIE: "When I was in Philadelphia in the winter of 1782-1783 a gentleman [probably James Madison].told me with much concern that you had written a book of journals & had a few copies printed, which had not only given great offence, but had very much lessened the public opinion of your talents. I think I need not tell you how deeply I felt this. He repeated to me perhaps half a dozen passages from your.Voiage de Newport a Philadelphie, and contained strictures on some of the ladies whom you had seen. The circumstances noted, the not intending they should be public, the conversations I had with you at Monticello.furnished me just ground enough to make my friend suppose that the passages.must not undo the public opinion of you. I heard much afterwards of these same passages. A twelvemonth after this.in the last winter 1783-1784 Mr. Marbois shewed me the book itself. I never was so astonished. I found it the most flattering account of America that had ever been written. I found indeed the passages which had been quoted; & what was remarkable was that there were in the whole book but about eight of these which could give offence to any body, and that the malice and curiosity of the world had immediately fished out these from those who were possessed of the book.knew not one word else of what was in it, but formed a general opinion that the whole was.a collection of personal strictures and satyre." Jefferson helpfully suggests outright removal of certain portions of text in Chastellux's work that will smooth over some of the perceived slights of America, especially the passages containing unflattering observations on American women, and then proposes translating the work for exposure to American readers: "I observed to Monsr. Marbois that it was much to be wished that you would let us strike out these passages, and translate and publish the work. He thought with me that it would be very pleasing to the Americans and valuable to yourself. He said he would write to you on the subject.but my appointment to come here prevented my doing it. I do not know that you have any occasion to set any value on the opinions of my countrymen. But you must allow myself to do it. It is irksome to us to have your worth mistaken; and it is much our wish to set it in its just point of view. This would be done effectually by translating and publishing the book, having first struck out the passages which gave offence and which were of the least importance of any in it. A preface might admit the former existence of such passages, justify their insertion in what was in. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 52445

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Country Seats of the United States of: BIRCH, WILLIAM R.

BIRCH, WILLIAM R.

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Buchbeschreibung: 1809. BIRCH, WILLIAM R. The Country Seats of the United States of North America, with Some Scenes Connected with Them. Springland near Bristol, Pa.: W. Birch, enamel painter, 1808 [i.e., 1809]. Oblong folio (225 x 285 mm.). 4 letterpress leaves, 20 hand colored engraved copper plates (complete). Marbled paper-covered boards, leather title label on front board, straight- grain red morocco gilt spine and corners (very skillfully rebacked). Light marginal foxing on the first letterpress leaf and a light dampstain at the extreme fore-edge of the last three letterpress leaves, else a remarkably fine, fresh copy, with the plates clean and bright and lovely. Contemporary ownership signature of Ann Rouse on title leaf. First edition of the second American color plate book, and a considerable rarity, missing from most institutional and private collections of early American color plate books. In 1800 William Birch had produced the first American color plate book, The City of Philadelphia, in the State of Pennsylvania North America, as it Appeared in the Year 1800. The work was a great success, in spite of its high price, and it gave Birch the encouragement he needed to continue. Sadly, Country Seats, issued a little over eight years later, was a commercial failure. While the Philadelphia work captured the civic pride and enthusiasm of a young nation, Country Seats, argued Philadelphia iconography authority Martin Snyder, "was much more a work born of Birch's individual background, ambitions, and failures. It was, in fact, the product of a desire to raise the prevailing levels of taste in homes and of a desire to identify himself with the leisurely and wealthy life externally portrayed in his pictures." The twenty color plates, a combination of line and stipple engraving and delicate coloring, depict gentlemen's country estates in Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Louisiana. Relatively few complete copies of the book survive. The last copy sold at public auction was the Martin Snyder/Jay Snider copy, Bloomsbury New York, 2008, 90,000 all in. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 14965

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Buchbeschreibung: In an unpublished and previously unknown decision, he finds that the powers of the Bank are limited vis a vis the U.S. governmentLikely the only autograph manuscript judicial opinion of Marshall as Chief justice issued to the U.S. government in private handsIn the aftermath of the War of 1812, the U.S. had a formidable debt. Inflation surged ever upward due to the ever-increasing amount of notes issued by private banks, and hard money was jealously hoarded. The Federal government suffered from the disarray of unregulated currency and money supply, and a lack of fiscal order and stability. Many people thought that a national bank would provide relief for the countryÕs ailing economy, help in paying its war debt, control inflation, and solve its national financial woes. Pressing to establish a second Bank of the United States were businessmen like financiers John Jacob Astor and Stephen Girard, and political leaders like Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Dallas, and Representative John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, who was chairman of the House Committee on the Currency. President James Madison felt that the time had come for Congress to move the country toward a more uniform paper currency, and that a bank would also aid in the resumption of trade and in dealing with war debt.The political climate Ð dubbed the Era of Good Feelings Ð favored the development of national programs and institutions such as a national bank, and at that time a protective tariff to encourage industry was also passed and internal improvements like roads and canals considered. The Second Bank of the United States (BUS), modeled on Alexander Hamilton's First Bank of the United States, was chartered by President Madison on April 10, 1816. It began operations at its main branch in Philadelphia on January 7, 1817, and just two months later, on March 4, 1817, Madison left office. James Monroe became President and William H. Crawford Secretary of the Treasury, and implementation of the bank would lie in their hands.The BUS was launched in the midst of a major global market readjustment as Europe recovered from the Napoleonic Wars. The central bank was charged with restraining uninhibited private bank note issue Ð already in progress Ð that threatened to create a credit bubble and the brought risk of a financial collapse. Government land sales in the West, fueled by European demand for agricultural products, increased concern that a speculative bubble might form. The public debt was high, depreciated bank notes were out in too great a number, and taxes were insufficient. The western branches of the BUS, and other branches existing where no official branch had been established, were issuing a large number of notes against which the specie of gold or silver did not exist, meaning that a sudden run on funds could crash the system. The task of Monroe, and the primary task of Crawford, was to re-establish sound credit and to bolster a teetering financial system. William Jones was the President of the Bank, and by all accounts his mismanagement led to the bankÕs needing more funds. One means of gathering income for the bank was the sale of its stock, which Jones and his cronies sought to do. Moreover, they hoped to inflate the value of the stock being sold to bring in more revenue. But the Act of Congress chartering the BUS included stipulations that the government first had the right to purchase at a defined rate before that stock was sold privately, and limited to $2 million per annum the amount of stock that might be sold. In 1817, therefore, Crawford informed the BUS that it would be purchasing the $2 million in stock that Jones aimed to sell. This Crawford knew would engender opposition, as it exhausted the amount of stock the bank could clearly sell, and prevented the stock value from being inflated. This situation, described in John Quincy Adams memoirs, induced Crawford to ask Chief Justice John Marshall (who was also a board member of the BankÕs sinking fu. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 11232

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G. P. Quackenbos, LL.D.

Verlag: D. Appelton & Co.

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Buchbeschreibung: D. Appelton & Co. Buchzustand: Good. Decorative Embossed Cover. Good, average condition for its age. Book has been read but remains straight, clean, and tight. No internal markings except for previous owner's stamp on title page. No Dust Jacket as issued. "Embracing a Full Account of the Aborigines; Biographical Notices of Distinguished Men; Numerous Maps, Plans of Battle-Fields, and Pictorial Illustrations; and Other Features Calculated to Give our Youth Correct Ideas of Their Country's Past and Present, and a Taste for General Historical Reading." Maroon cloth binding with gilt embossed insignia and lettering on spine. Marbled edges. Spine has a tear and small portion of title missing. Numerous black and white illustrations with 5 colour maps. Stored in sealed plastic protection. In the event of a problem we guarantee full refund. 1878. Decorative Embossed Cover. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 308717

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Dilley, Roy

Verlag: Almark Publishing Co.

ISBN 10: 0855240717 ISBN 13: 9780855240714

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Buchbeschreibung: Almark Publishing Co. Buchzustand: New. Trade paperback. First edition copy. NEW. Pristine condition. 1-14-10 Militaria. Stored in sealed plastic protection. No pricing stickers. No remainder mark. No previous owner's markings. In the event of a problem we guarantee full refund. 1972. Trade paperback. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 502544

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No Author

Verlag: Scott Publishing Co.

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Buchbeschreibung: Scott Publishing Co. Buchzustand: Very Good. Hardcover w / dustjacket. Very good condition; edges, corners, and covers of book show minor wear. No underlining; no highlighting; no internal markings. DJ is Good; edgewear, rubbing on folds, one small tear, priceclipped. Slight yellowing on endpapers with small smudge on ffep otherwise cean & tight. Stored in sealed plastic protection. In the event of a problem we guarantee full refund. 1970. Hardcover w / dustjacket. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 074130~

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U.S. Naval Institute

Verlag: U.S. Naval Institute

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Buchbeschreibung: U.S. Naval Institute. Buchzustand: Very Good. Calendar. . Not a first edition copy. Very good condition; edges, corners, and covers of book show minor wear. No underlining; no highlighting; no internal markings. No spine creasing. No remainder mark. Stored in sealed plastic protection. In the event of a problem we guarantee full refund. 1992. Calendar. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 306098

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Frank G. Spadone (Author), B&W Photographs (Illustrator)

Verlag: Frank G. Spadone

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Buchbeschreibung: Frank G. Spadone. Buchzustand: Very Good. Pamphlet. Very good condition; edges, corners, and covers of book show minor wear for its age--tight staple binding. No underlining; no highlighting; no internal markings. Stored in sealed plastic protection. In the event of a problem we guarantee full refund. 1965. Pamphlet. Buchnummer des Verkäufers J-90348

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MELISH, John (1771-1822).

Verlag: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1820. (1820)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1820., 1820. Folding engraved map (43 4/8 x 57 inches), 36 segments mounted on linen and hand-colored in a contemporary hand (some separation at folds, intermittent browning and slight offsetting); contemporary green paper boards slipcase, manuscript paper label on front cover (extremities worn with loss of one side strip). "I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace" (anonymous, recorded by Melish in his "Geographical Intelligence", 1818). 1820 edition, the RARE LARGE ISSUE, with the imprint reading "Entered according to Act of Congress the 16th day of June 1820." Melish published the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast in 1816, distinguishing him as "the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris." (Schwartz and Ehrenberg). Melish was inspired to create a large wall map of America by a friend who wrote to him "during the progress of war a very respectable Friend in Philadelphia, when talking of the Map of the Seat of War, said 'I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace.' The hint was not lost. The author had seen the good effects of maps, particularly when accompanied by descriptions " (reported by Ristow). Determined to keep his maps contemporary Melish is reknowned for reissuing numerous revisions of his maps: new editions, in a total of 24 issues, of this map were published in 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1823. Eight variants of the 1820 edition have been identified by Ristow. Melish himself outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 edition of "Geographical Description": "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as a part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from a conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." (reported by Ristow). This 1820 issue was the first to be published in the enlarged format. Ristow pp. 186-197; Schwartz and Ehrenberg page 238. [With:] MELISH, John. A Geographical Description of the United States, with the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions, intended as an Accompaniment to Melish's Map of these Countries. Philadelphia: for the Author, 1816. 8vo (8 1/8 x 5 inches). Errata leaf tipped-in before the title-page. Four engraved plates of plans of Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore (some browning and offsetting). Pages 167-182 publisher's advertisements, engraved folding hand-colored specimen map of Pennsylvania, and three pages of instructions and prospectus for constructing state and county maps of Pennsylvania. Contemporary half red roan, marbled boards (rebacked, front free endpaper replaced). Provenance: Contemporary signature of James Buchanan, 15th President of the United States (1857-1861), on the title-page; one or two contemporary annotations to the text and underscorings; Anonymous sale Sotheby's 25th January 1977, lot 82; Charles J. Tanenbaum, Collection of American Cartography. Second, enlarged edition. FROM THE LIBRARY OF JAMES BUCHANAN (1791-1868): "tall, stately, stiffly formal in the high stock he wore around his jowls, James Buchanan was the only President who never married. Presiding over a rapidly dividing Nation, Buchanan grasped inadequately the political r. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 001993

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Buchbeschreibung: Columbia [Tx.]. Nov. 1, 1836., 1836. [3]pp. on a folded folio sheet. Addressed for mailing (apparently in Houston's hand) on the blank fourth page, with a circular New Orleans postmark (in blue ink), a note "2/3" in red ink, and "10 for. 85" in black ink. Old folds from mailing, two small remnants of old red wax seal. Small hole from a seal, not affecting text. Two small tears near a cross-fold, affecting five letters of text. In very good condition. An outstanding letter from Sam Houston, one of the towering figures in Texas history, written just days after he became President of the Republic of Texas, and a little more than six months after he led Texian forces to victory at the Battle of San Jacinto, which secured the independence of Texas from Mexico. Samuel Houston (1793-1863) was elected President of the Republic of Texas on September 5, 1836, and became President on October 22, succeeding David Burnet, who had been interim President the previous seven months. In this letter Houston notes that "the eyes of the world are upon us," and that Texas is but an "infant Republic just emerging from the political season" with "difficulties and dangers on every side." He goes on to assert, however, that "these difficulties and dangers have been gloriously surmounted, and the bright star of Texian independence is seen moving rapidly onward to the meridian of its glory." Houston makes reference to his victory at San Jacinto, his initial disinclination to seek office, and exhibits gratitude to the people of Texas in investing him with their confidence by making him president of the fledgling Republic. Significantly, Houston writes that "the people of Texas have shown through the ballot box at the late election that they are decidedly in favor of annexation to the United States, and it is a matter worthy to be made known throughout your country." This is a remarkably early pronouncement from Houston on the desirability of annexing Texas to the United States, a subject that Houston returned to in his address to the Texas Legislature in May, 1837. He discusses the "common ancestry" of the peoples of both nations, urges Heyward to use the American press to lobby for annexation, and lauds Texas as a market for goods and produce from the United States. Houston closes the letter by attacking his predecessor and political enemy, former Texas President David Burnet, whom he calls "a poor dog, and I believe a very bad man, if not corrupt." Burnet and Houston were longstanding antagonists, and the two men would face each other again in a contentious campaign for President of Texas in 1841. The animosity between the two became so great that Burnet challenged Houston to a duel, which the latter declined. Houston wrote this letter to Elijah Hayward (1786-1864), a prominent Ohio lawyer and former judge of the Ohio Supreme Court, who had recently resigned his position as Commissioner of the General Land Office in Washington, DC. The relationship between Houston and Hayward is unclear, though the tone of this letter is certainly warm. Houston wrote this letter from Columbia, Texas, which from September to December, 1836, served as the capital of the Republic of Texas. The bulk of the letter is in a secretarial hand; Houston, always an erratic speller, generally preferred to dictate official correspondence. Houston writes: "Dear Sir, I have just received your letter of the 6th August, and it gives me much pleasure to know that although far removed from the most of my old friends in the United States, they still evince some interest in my own prosperity and an anxious solicitude for the success of the great cause of political and religious liberty in Texas. "The eyes of the world are upon us, and the events of the last twelve months have excited the generous sympathies of any patriot heart. We are an infant Republic just emerging from the political season, dark and gloomy have been our prospects, difficulties and dangers have attended on every side, but that gloom has in a great measure be. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 47218

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MELISH, John (1771-1822).

Verlag: Philadelphia: James Finlayson successor to John Melish, 1823. (1823)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: James Finlayson successor to John Melish, 1823., 1823. Folding engraved map (45 x 57 4/8 inches), in 50 sections mounted on cartographic linen, with original hand-color in outline, with small inset of West Indies lower right, and statistical table lower left (intermittent browning and slight offsetting, linen with a few stains); original marbled paper self covers on verso. Provenance: with the ownership inscription of E. Harkness on the front cover. "I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace" (anonymous, recorded by Melish in his "Geographical Intelligence", 1818). 1820 edition, the large issue, with the imprint reading "Entered according to Act of Congress the 16th day of June 1820", with "improvements to 1823". Melish published the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast in 1816, distinguishing him as "the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris." (Schwartz and Ehrenberg). Melish was inspired to create a large wall map of America by a friend who wrote to him "during the progress of war. a very respectable Friend in Philadelphia, when talking of the Map of the Seat of War, said 'I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace.' The hint was not lost. The author had seen the good effects of maps, particularly when accompanied by descriptions." (reported by Ristow). Determined to keep his maps contemporary Melish is renowned for reissuing numerous revisions of his maps: new editions, in a total of 24 issues, of this map were published in 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1823. Eight variants of the 1820 edition have been identified by Ristow. Melish himself outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 edition of "Geographical Description": "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as a part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from a conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." (reported by Ristow pages 186-197). Schwartz and Ehrenberg page 238. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72map87

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BRADLEY, Abraham, Jr. (1767-1838)

Verlag: Philadelphia, 1804 [but After 1812] (1812)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia, 1804 [but After 1812], 1812. Fine folding engraved map, float-mounted and framed (framed dimensions: 38 x 52 inches), laid down on cartographical linen in 32 sections, with original hand-colour in outline and in part. Fourth edition, corrected to 1812, showing both Louisiana and Missouri Territory, established in 1812. The Mississippi River from the junction of the Ohio north to the Wyaconda River has been redrawn due to the public surveys in southern Illinois, exhibted by the addition of Township and Range lines. "Numerous other changes from the 1804 edition have been made throughout the map adding new counties, towns, roads, and changed physical features, primarily in the mid and western portions. Since it was a postal map and needed to be current as to towns, road and counties, it is probable that the map was updated every few years, until a new plate was made in 1819 by Harrison (Karpinski 59, Karrow 1-1466). The 1796 edition of this map (a different engraving) was changed four times in as many years (Wheat & Brun 127-130). The 1819 edition became the official post office map in 1825, used until 1829 (Ristow). All of the 1804 to 1812 editions were originally engraved by Francis Shallus of Philadelphia" (David Rumsey 2929001). Abraham Bradley, Jr.'s Map of the United States was a landmark production, arguably the first such detailed map produced by an American mapmaker and a visual testament to the growing expertise of the country's printers and cartographers after the triumph of the Revolution. An indigenous cartography sprang up and eventually flourished during the nineteenth century in response to nationalism, exploration, settlement, war, rising literacy, and finally, the exploitation of natural resources. Appointed a clerk in the American general post office in 1791 "Bradley's best known accomplishment was his authorship of a notable map of the United States, the first edition of which appeared in 1796, and the second in 1804, following the acquisition of the Louisiana territory. Bradley's maps were hung in many of the republic's post offices and were reprinted in Jedidiah Morse's American Universal Geography. Historians have agreed that the 1796 edition provides the best source of information about the geographical extent of the United States in the decade following the adoption of the federal Constitution. To a greater degree than almost any other single document published during this period, Bradley's maps helped to impress ordinary Americans with the size of the country and to transform the ill-defined frontier into a sharply etched border. "Bradley also coordinated the movement of the mail and took great pride in his almost encyclopedic knowledge of every single postal route in the country. Since most stagecoach firms relied on mail contracts to cover their costs, Bradley was thus largely responsible for the scheduling of passenger service throughout the United States. Though Bradley supported the subsidization of the stagecoach industry, he remained troubled by the potential for abuse. This was particularly true during the administration of Andrew Jackson; Bradley publicly denounced the Jacksonians for their "stage mania," by which he meant their lavish policy of subsidizing the industry with little regard to cost (John, p. 243). "To help keep expenses under control, Bradley personally supervised the payment of mail contractors, a challenging task. Because the United States lacked a single currency during this period, it was difficult to pay agents who lived at a great distance from Washington. To help overcome this problem, Bradley assumed the presidency of the Union Bank of Georgetown at some point prior to 1820. This made it possible for Bradley's signature to appear on the bank notes that the general post office disbursed. The fact that Bradley's signature was well known facilitated the transmission of postal revenue from the general post office to the contractors in the field" (Richard R. John for ANB). P-Maps p874; Ristow p70-1; Schwar. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 1016mb1

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A New American Atlas containing Maps of: TANNER, H.[enry] S.[chenck]

Buchbeschreibung: H.S. Tanner, Philadelphia, 1823. Folio. (23 7/8 x 16 5/8 inches). Letterpress half-title, 1p. index and 18pp. text. Engraved title with vignette of the "First Landing of Columbus in the New World", 18 fine hand-coloured engraved maps (16 double-page, 2 folding). Expertly bound to style in half-calf over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine gilt and divided into seven compartments by fillets and roll tools, lettered in the second compartment, the others with repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers A fine copy of the first collected edition of "the most distinguished atlas published in the United States during the engraving period" (Ristow). Tanner's New American Atlas contained the most accomplished series of maps of America that had yet appeared in an atlas. Of the greatest importance were the maps of American states. These maps were drawn up using a careful combination of original surveys and the best existing published sources. The evident high cost of production meant that the publishers took the decision to issue the maps in five separate parts which were published from 1819 to 1823. A second revised edition appeared in 1825. The maps, all of which are carefully hand-coloured, include a double-page world map, 4 double-page maps of continents, a map of South America on two joined sheets (numbered 6 and 7 in the index), a map of North America on 4 joined sheets (numbered 8 -11) and 11 double-page maps of the various States. The very large map of North America is of particular beauty and note. Wheat writes: "This map was a landmark - a great cartographical achievement . Tanner made good use of a large number of intervening map, those of interest here being Humboldt's 'New Spain,' Pike's various maps, Long's map, and Pedro Walker's 'Map of New California' . This 1822 map of North America was the progenitor of a long line of famous maps" (Wheat, II: pp. 82-87). Contemporary reviews of the atlas were favourable: the New American Atlas "is decidedly one of the most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country" (United States Gazette, September 1823). Never "has either America or Europe, produced a geographical description of the several States of the Union, so honorable to the Arts, and so creditable to the nation as Tanner's American Atlas." (National Advocate 25 August 1824). Perhaps the most enthusiastic report came from the scholar Jared Sparks who wrote in the April 1824 issue of the North American Review that "as an American Atlas, we believe Mr. Tanner's work to hold a rank far above any other, which has been published." Howes T29; Phillips 1376; cf. Ristow American Maps and Map Makers pp. 154 &193-198; Rumsey 2892; Sabin 94319; Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 350. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 20430

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A New American Atlas containing Maps of: TANNER, H.[enry] S.[chenck]

Buchbeschreibung: H.S. Tanner, Philadelphia, 1825. Folio. (23 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches). Letterpress half-title, 1p. index and 18pp. text. Engraved title with vignette of the "First Landing of Columbus in the New World, 21 fine hand-coloured engraved map sheets (16 maps on 16 double-page sheets; 1 map on one folding sheet; and 1 map on 4 double-page sheets), some expert restoration to corners. Expertly bound to style in half brown straight-grained morocco over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine divided into six compartments by double gilt rules, lettered in the second compartment, the others with repeat decoration in gilt, contained within a modern red morocco-backed cloth box, the spine in seven compartments with raised bands, lettered in the second, the others with repeat tooling in gilt A fine copy of the improved second edition of "one the most magnificent atlases ever published in the United States" (Ristow). Tanner's New American Atlas contained the most accomplished series of maps of America that had yet appeared in an atlas. Of the greatest importance were the maps of American states, which were highly detailed and brilliantly coloured. While New York and Florida each had their own dedicated page, other double-page sheets showcased multiple states at a time. As the title claims, these maps were drawn up using a careful combination of original surveys and the best existing published sources. The evident high cost of production meant that the publishers took the decision to issue the maps originally in five separate parts which were published from 1819 to 1823. A first collected edition was published in 1823, and this second revised edition appeared in 1825. The maps, all of which are carefully hand-coloured, include a world map, 4 maps of continents, a map of South America on a large folding sheet made up from two joined sheets (the index calls for two separate sheets), a map of North America on 4 sheets and 11 double-page maps of the various States. The very large map of North America is of particular beauty and note. Wheat writes: "This map was a landmark - a great cartographical achievement . Tanner made good use of a large number of intervening map, those of interest here being Humboldt's 'New Spain,' Pike's various maps, Long's map, and 'Pedro Walker's Map of New California . This 1822 map of North America was the progenitor of a long line of famous maps" (Wheat, II: pp. 82-87) Contemporary reviews were favourable: the New American Atlas "is decidedly one of the most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country" ( United States Gazette , September 1823). Never "has either America or Europe, produced a geographical description of the several States of the Union, so honorable to the Arts, and so creditable to the nation as Tanner's American Atlas." ( National Advocate 25 August 1824). Perhaps the most enthusiastic report came from the scholar Jared Sparks who wrote in the April 1824 issue of the North American Review that "as an American Atlas, we believe Mr. Tanner's work to hold a rank far above any other, which has been published." This second edition is notable for the significant cartographic changes made by Tanner, reflecting new boundaries, counties, towns and discoveries since the initial maps were published. For example, the map of Illinois shows significant changes to the mapping of the headwaters of the Mississippi, and the map of Louisiana depicts Indian lands with vast changes from the first edition. Howes T29; Phillips 3669; cf. Ristow, American Maps and Map Makers , pp. 193-198; Rumsey 2755; Sabin 94323. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 17477

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MELISH, John (1771-1822)

Verlag: [Philadelphia (1816)

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Buchbeschreibung: [Philadelphia, 1816. Engraved map, engraved by J. Vallance & H. S. Tanner, period hand colouring in outline, dissected into 40 sections and linen-backed, as issued. Housed in a full blue morocco box. The first large-scale map of the United States and a cornerstone map of the American west: first edition, fourth state. A map of inestimable importance - one which synthesized the best data available at the crucial moment of the opening of American West, and one which, in a sense, envisioned and enabled the 'Manifest Destiny' of the United States. "The cartographic publication that best publicized for the American people the data derived from the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Zebulon Pike's exploration of the southwest in 1806 and 1807 was John Melish's 1816 Map of the United States ." (Ristow p.446) Also, much like the Mitchell map of the previous century, the Melish map became the map of record in many important treaties between the United States and Spain, Mexico, and both the Republic and State of Texas. Specifically, the United States-Mexico boundary was laid out on a copy of the map according to the Adams-Onis Treaty signed in February 22, 1819. Martin and Martin write: "Recognizing that the demand for geographical information on the American west was limitless in the foreseeable future, Melish undertook to accumulate a vast amount of descriptions, statistics and maps and in 1816 produced in six sheets his famous map . For the Texas area, Melish relied heavily on the surveys conducted by William Darby, who had personally surveyed much of the Sabine River area . Melish's map significantly improved the descriptions and depictions of the Texas interior, but perhaps its most lasting value to history was its official association with the Adams-Onis Treaty, because Melish's 90th meridian, today the eastern boundary of the Texas Panhandle, was off by approximately ninety miles, controversy and court litigation concerning the correct boundary lasted well beyond Texas's annexation . Of lasting value, too, was the widespread dissemination of new information concerning Texas geography only five years before Stephen F. Austin decided to honor his father's contract with the Mexican government to bring Anglo-American settlers to inhabit this rich new land" (Martin & Martin). The map also played a key role in the development of American mapmaking. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris" (Schwartz). In fact, Melish founded the first company in the United States to deal specifically in maps and geographical works. The map was engraved by arguably the two finest map engravers in the United States at the time, John Vallance and Henry S. Tanner. It set a new standard for clarity and precision in map production. The present copy is the fourth state of the first edition of 1816, as identified by Ristow (in A la carte pp.162-182, the most complete account of the map): a rare early issue of the first edition, prior to Mississippi Territory being divided into the State of Mississippi and Alabama Territory. There are two primary reasons for the great rarity of this map: firstly, Melish only printed 100 copies of each issue to allow him to constantly update the map with the latest geographical information, the second reason is its large size which has ensured a high attrition rate over the past two centuries. It would not be exaggerating to say that Melish's map, the first on a large scale to show the area of the present United States from coast to coast, provided most Americans with their first clear-sighted view of the continental landmass of which the United States was a part. Although the term Manifest Destiny, referring to the inevitability of the growth of the United States across the entire continent, was not current until the 1840s, there can be little doubt that this powerful cartographic image. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 30516

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner, 1825., 1825. Letterpress half title, 1p. index, and 18pp. text. Engraved title with vignette of the "First Landing of Columbus in the New World." Eighteen fine handcolored engraved maps on twenty-one sheets (sixteen maps on sixteen double page sheets, one map on folding sheet, map of United States on four double page sheets). Folio. Expertly bound to style in half brown straight- grained morocco and contemporary marbled boards, spine gilt. Very good. In a red half morocco and cloth box, spine gilt. A fine copy of the second edition of "one the most magnificent atlases ever published in the United States," engraved during the "Golden Age of American Cartography" (Ristow). Tanner's NEW AMERICAN ATLAS contains the most accomplished series of maps of America that had yet appeared in an atlas. Of the greatest importance were the maps of American states, which were highly detailed and brilliantly colored. While New York and Florida each had their own dedicated page, other double-page sheets showcased multiple states at a time. As the title claims, these maps were drawn up using a careful combination of original surveys and the best existing published sources. The evident high cost of production meant that the publishers took the decision to issue the maps originally in five separate parts which were published from 1819 to 1823. A first collected edition was published in 1823, and this second revised edition appeared in 1825. The maps, all of which are carefully handcolored, include a world map, four maps of continents, a map of South America on a large folding sheet made up from two joined sheets (the index calls for two separate sheets), a map of North America on four sheets, and eleven double-page maps of the various states. The very large map of North America is of particular beauty and note. "This map was a landmark - a great cartographical achievement.Tanner made good use of a large number of intervening map, those of interest here being Humboldt's 'New Spain,' Pike's various maps, Long's map, and 'Pedro Walker's Map of New California.This 1822 map of North America was the progenitor of a long line of famous maps" - Wheat. Contemporary reviews were favorable: A NEW AMERICAN ATLAS "is decidedly one of the most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country" (UNITED STATES GAZETTE, September 1823). Never "has either America or Europe, produced a geographical description of the several States of the Union, so honorable to the Arts, and so creditable to the nation as Tanner's AMERICAN ATLAS" (NATIONAL ADVOCATE, Aug. 25, 1824). The most enthusiastic report came from scholar Jared Sparks, who wrote in the April 1824 issue of the NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW that "as an AMERICAN ATLAS, we believe Mr. Tanner's work to hold a rank far above any other, which has been published." HOWES T29. PHILLIPS ATLASES 1376. RISTOW, pp.154, 193-98 (ref). RUMSEY 2892. SABIN 94319. WHEAT TRANSMISSISSIPPI 350. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 39227

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Buchbeschreibung: [Phiadelphia. 1816]., 1816. Engraved map, engraved by J. Vallance & H. S. Tanner, period hand-coloring in outline, dissected into 40 sections and linen-backed, as issued. Sheet size: 34 x 56 3/4 inches. Very good. In a blue morocco box. First edition, fourth state, of a map of inestimable importance - one which synthesized the best data available at the crucial moment of the opening of American West, and one which, in a sense, envisioned and enabled the 'Manifest Destiny' of the United States. "The cartographic publication that best publicized for the American people the data derived from the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Zebulon Pike's exploration of the southwest in 1806 and 1807 was John Melish's 1816 MAP OF THE UNITED STATES" - Ristow, p.446. Also, much like the Mitchell map of the previous century, the Melish map became the map of record in many important treaties between the United States and Spain, Mexico, and both the Republic and State of Texas. Specifically, the United States-Mexico boundary was laid out on a copy of the map according to the Adams-Onis Treaty signed in Feb. 22, 1819. Martin & Martin write: "Recognizing that the demand for geographical information on the American west was limitless in the foreseeable future, Melish undertook to accumulate a vast amount of descriptions, statistics and maps and in 1816 produced in six sheets his famous map.For the Texas area, Melish relied heavily on the surveys conducted by William Darby, who had personally surveyed much of the Sabine River area.Melish's map significantly improved the descriptions and depictions of the Texas interior, but perhaps its most lasting value to history was its official association with the Adams-Onis Treaty, because Melish's 90th meridian, today the eastern boundary of the Texas Panhandle, was off by approximately ninety miles, controversy and court litigation concerning the correct boundary lasted well beyond Texas's annexation.Of lasting value, too, was the widespread dissemination of new information concerning Texas geography only five years before Stephen F. Austin decided to honor his father's contract with the Mexican government to bring Anglo-American settlers to inhabit this rich new land." The map also played a key role in the development of American mapmaking. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris" - Schwartz. In fact, Melish founded the first company in the United States to deal specifically in maps and geographical works. The map was engraved by arguably the two finest map engravers in the United States at the time, John Vallance and Henry S. Tanner. It set a new standard for clarity and precision in map production. The present copy is the fourth state of the first edition of 1816, as identified by Ristow in A LA CARTE (pp.162-182, the most complete account of the map): a rare early issue of the first edition, prior to Mississippi Territory being divided into the State of Mississippi and Alabama Territory. There are two primary reasons for the great rarity of this map: firstly, Melish only printed 100 copies of each issue to allow him to constantly update the map with the latest geographical information, the second reason is its large size which has ensured a high attrition rate over the past two centuries. It would not be exaggerating to say that Melish's map, the first on a large scale to show the area of the present United States from coast to coast, provided most Americans with their first clear-sighted view of the continental landmass of which the United States was a part. Although the term Manifest Destiny, referring to the inevitability of the growth of the United States across the entire continent, was not current until the 1840s, there can be little doubt that this powerful cartographic image was suggestive of the concept. Such can be gleaned from Thomas Jefferson, who said of th. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 51308

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JACKSON Andrew WASHINGTON George MADISON James MONROE James ADAMS John ADAMS John Quincy JEFFERSON Thomas

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Buchbeschreibung: 1795. WASHINGTON, George; ADAMS, John; JEFFERSON, Thomas; MADISON, James; MONROE, James; ADAMS, John Quincy, et al. Archive of 14 ship's papers signed by 14 of the first 15 Presidents of the United States; 14 documents signed, partially printed and completed in manuscript. New York: 1795-1857. Together, 14 printed documents engrossed in manuscript. Broadsides (various sizes), printed and signed on rectos, with original paper seals. Each mounted on a leaf in an early 20th-century full limp crimson morocco album (17 by 22 inches), patterned endpapers. $85,000.Fantastic archive of 14 rare original ship's papers each signed by one of the first 15 Presidents of the United States, from George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison through James Buchanan, compiled over the course of 62 years (with the only exception of the ninth president, William Harrison, who was only president for one month), with Washington's signature particularly bold, rare and desirable. As each is also countersigned by the Secretary of State, the signatures of three presidents who served as Secretary of State under previous administrations—James Madison, John Quincy Adams and James Buchanan—appear twice in this archive; along with the signatures of such notables as Edmund Randolph, Timothy Pickering, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Daniel Webster. These documents are in excellent condition, each with the fragile affixed paper seals of the United States present.Because ships leaving U.S. ports needed ship identification papers before a voyage, documents such as these were signed by the President and Secretary of State ahead of time and forwarded to the port. The Collector of the Port would then fill in the required information for each ship and the date, and the Collector of Customs at the port would typically countersign.The "Sea Letters" are as follows:1. Signed by George Washington, April 2, 1795; also signed by Edmund Randolph as Sec. of State. For the "Lovely Rachel" out of Philadelphia.2. Signed by John Adams, August 31, 1797; also signed by Timothy Pickering as Sec. of State. For the "Olive Branch" out of New York.3. Signed by Thomas Jefferson, June 22, 1805; also by James Madison as Sec. of State. For the "Sophrona" out of New York.4. Signed by James Madison, November 29, 1809; also by Robert Smith as Sec. of State. For the "Andrew" out of New York.5. Signed by James Monroe, August 8, 1823; also by John Quincy Adams as Sec. of State. For the "Huntress" out of New York.6. Signed by John Quincy Adams, May 21, 1827; also by Henry Clay as Sec. of State. For the "Perseverance" out of New York.7. Signed by Andrew Jackson, October 18, 1833; also by Louis McLane as Sec. of State. For the "Alexander" out of New York.8. Signed by Martin Van Buren, December 8, 1837; also by John Forsyth as Sec. of State. For the "White Oak" out of Staten Island.(9. Understandably, no ship's paper signed by the ninth president, William H. Harrison, is present in this archive. Harrison died after only 32 days in office, and ship's papers signed by him—indeed, any document signed by him while in office—are extremely rare.)10. Signed by John Tyler, May 10, 1844; also by John C. Calhoun as Sec. of State. For the "Montauk" out of New York.11. Signed by James K. Polk, April 15, 1847; also by James Buchanan as Sec. of State. For the "Heber" out of Boston.12. Signed by Zachary Taylor, April 17, 1850; also by John M. Clayton as Sec. of State. For the "St. Patrick" out of New York.13. Signed by Millard Fillmore, 1850; also by Daniel Webster as Sec. of State. The document has been left blank.14. Signed by Franklin Pierce, July 11, 1854; also by William L. Marcy as Sec. of State. For the "Contest" out of New York.15. Signed by James Buchanan, 1857; also by Lewis Cass as Sec. of State. The document has been left blank. An old leaf of thick paper, evidently part of the wrapper that enclosed the documents before they were mounted into this large album, bears the following ink insc. Signed. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 107456

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The voice of truth, containing General Joseph: Smith, Joseph

Buchbeschreibung: printed by John Taylor, Nauvoo, Ill, 1844. First edition, 8vo, pp. 64; woodcut portrait of Smith in military garb in the text; original printed wrappers; uncut, fore-edge ragged, minor loss at fore-edge of wrappers. The wrappers are dated 1845. Crawley 271: "With his name attached to the copyright notice.it seems clear that the book was compiled by W. W. Phelps, who actually wrote most of the contents.The dedicatory poem.dated June 1844, and the fact that Phelps obtained the copyright on June 22 suggest it was put to press shortly before Joseph Smith's death, probably as a piece for his presidential campaign.but his assassination interrupted the printing and the unfinished book lay in the Times and Seasons shop until it was eventually completed as a memorial to him." [Hence, the 1845 date on the wrappers.] The all-important "King Follett funeral discourse, headed Joseph Smith's last Sermon, delivered at the April Conference, 1844, is added in Voice of Truth as an appendix (pp. 59-64). It is not listed on the title page and was not originally intended to be included in the pamphlet, but it is noted on the printed wrapper." Byrd 899; Flake 8000; Graff 3858. Howes S629. Sabin 83288. Crawley locates 9 copies (Yale, Neweberry, Illinois Historical, Harvard, NYPL, Utah, Brigham Young, and the LDS. OCLC adds the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, Southern Illinois University, Community of Christ Library in Missouri, and Princeton. Byrd notes that the University of Kansas City copy has the wrappers. No copies in ABPC back to 1976. The NYPL copy has last 2 pages mutilated and lacks the wrapper; the Newberry copy with a fragment of the wrapper only. The wrappers are rare. Of the dozen or so copies located, it is likely less than a handful retain them. This is significant in that the back wrapper contains the poem "The Cap Stone," a poem in 40 lines, by Phelps. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 48090

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ARROWSMITH, Aaron (1750-1823).

Verlag: London: A. Arrowsmith, 1796, Additions 1802 [but, After 1808]. (1808)

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Buchbeschreibung: London: A. Arrowsmith, 1796, Additions 1802 [but, After 1808]., 1808. Fine folding engraved wall map in four separate sheets mounted on cartographic linen (each 25 x 29 inches), each in 15 sections, with EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND DELICATE ORIGINAL HAND-COLOUR IN FULL, and decorated with a large and fine vignette of Niagara Falls lower right (some light browning and offsetting); original blue paper boards slipcase (quite worn at extremities), title on printed paper label on front cover, and sectional titles on printed labels on verso of each section. Provenance: with the contemporary mapseller's label of C. Smith of the Strand on the verso of one section. AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE EXAMPLE OF ARROWSMITH'S IMPORTANT MAP of America, first issued 1796, this is the second edition with Additions to 1802, third issue with Arrowsmith's address given as "10 Soho Square", and Arrowsmith is now styled "Hydrographer to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales". The 1802 edition is the last of Arrowsmith's large American maps to be issued before the Louisiana Purchase and it is known that Thomas Jefferson ordered himself a copy at about the same time as the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. It is also the edition that Lewis and Clark consulted for their monumental expedition. Arrowsmith's 'Map of the United States of North America' is the most desirable from his well noted career. An acclaimed British cartographer, Aaron Arrowsmith drafted accurate, detailed charts that earned him the titles of Hydrographer to the King of England and Geographer to the Prince of Wales, extremely important distinctions during an era when Britain ruled the waves. One of the first great British cartographers of North America, Arrowsmith introduced a new standard of excellence in mapmaking in the late 18th century and almost single-handedly made London the center for the cartographic trade. Arrowsmith built his great success on this ability to attract both commercial and general viewers through his combination of visual and scientific appeal. The most influential and respected map publisher of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Arrowsmith issued maps that were the result of careful synthesis rather than systematic, scientific inquiry. His role in cartographic production was to gather the best available information from a wide variety of sources, weigh the relative merits of conflicting data, and compile the most accurate depiction possible of an area. Arrowsmith accomplished this synthesis better than any other commercial mapmaker of his day and, as a result, his maps were the most sought after and highly prized on three continents. Stephens 79 (e). Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72map43

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MELISH, John (1771-1822)

Verlag: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1816 (1816)

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia: John Melish, 1816, 1816. EXCEPTIONALLY FINE engraved folding map (36 x 58 4/8 inches) by J. Vallance and H.S. Tanner, laid down on cartographic linen in 40 sections, edged with green silk, with original hand-colour in outline (some occasional pale spotting), folds with marbled end sheets; contemporary half red roan, marbled paper boards portfolio, two pairs of linen ties. THE FIRST AMERICAN-PRODUCED WALL MAP DEPICTING THE COUNTRY FROM COAST TO COAST. Apparently the fourth state, with Cadiz, Washington, Cambridge, Adelphi, Mansfield and Wooster added in Ohio and "Vevay or" added before "Swiss Vineyards" in southeastern Indiana. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris. Incorporating data from state and military maps as these became available, Melish frequently revised and corrected the plates, limiting each printing to 100 copies" (Seymour I. Schwartz and Ralph E. Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, Edison, NJ, 2001, p.238). "I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace" (anonymous, recorded by Melish in his "Geographical Intelligence", 1818). Melish published the first American-produced wall map depicting the country from coast to coast, inspired by a friend who wrote to him "during the progress of war. a very respectable Friend in Philadelphia, when talking of the Map of the Seat of War, said 'I wish friend John, thee would make a Map of the Seat of Peace.' The hint was not lost. The author had seen the good effects of maps, particularly when accompanied by descriptions." (reported by Ristow). Determined to keep his maps contemporary Melish is reknowned for reissuing numerous revisions of his maps: new editions, in a total of 24 issues, of this map were published in 1818, 1819, 1820, and 1823, and Melish himself outlined the reasons for the principal changes in his posthumously published 1826 edition of "Geographical Description": "When the late treaty was negotiated with Spain which had reference to the map in fixing the southwest boundary, it was determined to bring forward an entire new edition of the Map, exhibiting Florida as a part of the United States, and making all alterations that had taken place in the country, up to the time of publication; and from a conviction that Mexico would soon become independent, and would eventually be of great importance to the United States, it was determined to add another sheet exhibiting a complete view of that very interesting country, with all the most important West India Islands. This was accordingly executed, and the supplement was so enlarged as to exhibit a view of the whole West Indies, with Guatimala, the Isthmus of Panama, and the northern provinces of South America, now forming part of the Republic of Colombia." (reported by Ristow). Martin/Ristow 24; Streeter VI:3798. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 72map44

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Buchbeschreibung: H. S. Tanner, Philadelphia, 1825. Buchzustand: Very Good. Tanner’s New American Atlas, 1825. Masterpiece of 19th Century American Cartography. Fine example of Tanner’s revised and updated second edition of "one of the most magnificent atlases ever published in the United States," (Walter Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers). Includes splendid four sheet wall map of North America joined for display in original hand color.Condition: Maps in fine condition. Tanner’s maps were scrupulously detailed and updated with latest changes in explorations,state, county and town surveys, (having issued two versions of Tennessee in 1823: one with nine unnamed new counties and the next with those counties named). His attention to geographic detail is matched by his mastery of cartographic design, engraving and choice of coloring. This atlas contains maps of the world, four continents, a large South America, 11 double-page maps of groupings of states, and the magnificent wall map of North America with its handsome title cartouche showing American wildlife. No other atlas of the period has such aesthetic appeal and cartographic significance. *****Marked DO NOT LIST ON WEB****** 3-14-2016 PER PHONE CALL FROM OWNER. book. Buchnummer des Verkäufers B-000022870

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Buchbeschreibung: Philadelphia & New York: Francis Childs and John Swaine, [1789-1791]., 1791. Three volumes bound in one. 93,[1]; 228; [3],228-277,[1 blank],[278]- 279pp. Folio. Contemporary calf, expertly rebacked in period style, original gilt morocco label preserved. Rubbed. Scattered dampstaining and foxing. Overall very good. In a half morocco box. The acts of Congress from the first three sessions of the first Congress, including: The first edition of the ACTS PASSED AT A CONGRESS., recording the work of the First Federal Congress. The first session of Congress met in New York on March 4, 1789 and continued until the end of September. It officially ratified the Constitution and Washington's election as first U.S. president, and passed much of the most basic legislation for the machinery of government, regulating the Customs, Judiciary, Post Office, Mint, and the like. Much time was spent on the Bill of Rights, which appears here, still including twelve amendments (the first two, relating to the numbers in a congressional district and congressional salaries, were later omitted). Needless to say, all of these things make the acts of this session a foundation work in the history of American government. Evans erroneously records two distinct issues of the first ACTS., calling this state a second edition. The North American Imprints Project has now established there is only one folio edition of the Acts, using the same paper stock, and that the only difference between the two states Evans records is in the inclusion of an index (not present with this state). The first edition of the ACTS PASSED AT THE SECOND SESSION. "contains the Treaties and Conventions ratified with the several countries of Europe, and with the Indian tribes" (Evans). Much more important foundation legislation was passed in this session, including the Census act, naturalization law, the copyright bill, the first patent legislation ("An Act to Promote the Progress of Useful Arts"), a law defining treason, the law putting Hamilton's Public Credit proposals into effect, the settling of the District of Columbia as the seat of the new government, and various tariff and fiscal laws. This issue of the ACTS PASSED AT THE THIRD SESSION. is apparently unrecorded. Evans and NAIP cite two other folio editions: another Philadelphia edition of 286 pages, and a Richmond edition printed for the General Assembly of the State of Virginia. This 279-page edition clearly is complete in itself: the last printing is halfway down the recto of the leaf, followed by a terminal type ornament. Evans states that the 286-page version is not the first, without providing an alternative. It seems likely that this is the actual first issue. More important legislation is found here: the admission of Vermont, the incorporation of the Bank of the United States, the admission of Kentucky, and the establishment of the Mint. Also included are printings of all treaties concluded by the United States up to that point; the original 1778 treaties with France, the 1782 treaty of alliance with the Dutch Republic, the preliminary and final peace treaties with Great Britain, commercial treaties with Sweden and Prussia, friendship with Morocco, and the Consular Convention with France of 1788. Additionally, all of the Indian treaties which appear up to that time are printed: the Fort Stanwix treaty of 1784 with the Six Nations; the Fort McIntosh treaty of 1785 with tribes in Ohio; the Hopewell treaty of 1786 with the Cherokees; the Great Miami treaty of 1786 with the Shawnees; and the 1790 treaty with the Creeks. A foundation volume of laws. EVANS 23842 (1st session), 22952 (2nd session), 23845 (3rd session, another issue). ESTC W14375. Buchnummer des Verkäufers WRCAM 28226

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The Birds of America, from Drawings Made: AUDUBON, John James.

AUDUBON, John James.

Verlag: New York & Philadelphia: J. J. Audubon and [vols. I-V] J. B. Chevalier, [1839-]1840–1844. (1844)

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Buchbeschreibung: New York & Philadelphia: J. J. Audubon and [vols. I-V] J. B. Chevalier, [1839-]1840–1844., 1844. 7 volumes, octavo. (250 × 147 mm). Recently rebound to style in black half morocco, gilt panelled spines with owl and eagle motifs, contemporary marbled sides, speckled edges, endleaves renewed. A few plates trimmed by the binder with concomitant shaving of a few captions (encroaching on the plate itself in only one instance). An excellent set. 500 hand-coloured lithographic plates after Audubon by W. E. Hitchcock, R. Trembley and others, printed by J. T. Bowen of Philadelphia (plates 1–135, 151–500) or George Endicott of New York (plates 136–150), numerous wood-engraved anatomical figures in text. First octavo edition of Audubon's "Great National Work", the first complete edition and the first American edition, the original double-elephant folio was published in Edinburgh and London between 1827 and 1838. A very handsome set, the plates clean and fresh, of the "most beautiful, popular, and important natural history books published in America in the nineteenth century. representing the best of pre-Civil War American lithography and giving Audubon the opportunity finally to display his scholarship and genius to a large American audience for the first time" (Ron Tyler). The plates, here accompanied by the text for the first time, were reduced and variously modified from the Havell engravings in the double-elephant folio. Seven new species are figured and seventeen others, previously described in the Ornithological Biography but not illustrated, are pictured for the first time. Audubon may have been prompted to publish the reduced version of his double-elephant folio by the appearance in 1839 of John Kirk Townsend's rival Ornithology of the United States, or, as he writes in the introduction to the present work, he may have succumbed to public demand and his wish that a work similar to his large work should be published but "at such a price, as would enable every student or lover of nature to place it in his Library". The first edition of the octavo work now represents the only realistic opportunity that exists for collectors to own an entire collection of Audubon images in a form that was overseen and approved by the great artist himself. Bennett p.5; Nissen IVB 51; Ripley 13; Ron Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work (1993) Appendix I; Sabin 2364; Zimmer p.22. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 114339

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Buchbeschreibung: C. & A. Conrad, et al., Philadelphia, 1810. 8vo (9 x 6 inches). Frontispiece portrait (browned), three folding tables, six engraved maps at the end including five fine folding, of which two are charts of the "Internal Part of Louisiana," one map and one sketch of the "Internal Provinces of New Spain," and a "Map of the Mississippi River from its Source to the Mouth of the Missouri" (only very lightly browned with some minor offsetting, small marginal tear to A2 just crossing the text, first page of Appendix I torn with an early repair). ORIGINAL BLUE PAPER BOARDS, remains of printed paper label on the spine, uncut (spine worn with some loss); modern cloth clamshell box. Provenance: One contemporary marginal annotation to the second appendix of part one; with Dorothy Sloan 15th February 2006, lot 68 AN EXCEPTIONAL COPY IN ORIGINAL BOARDS OF THE FIRST EDITION OF THE FIRST GOVERNMENT EXPLORATION OF THE SOUTHWEST. First edition of the first U.S. government exploration of the Southwest. This edition contains the first appearance in print of the first maps of the Southwest to be based on firsthand exploration. The Louisiana Purchase was one of Thomas Jefferson's crowning achievements, and in the following four years he commissioned a number of expeditions to explore the largely unknown territory. In 1804 Lewis and Clark ventured westward from St. Louis; Sibley, Dunbar and Freeman explored the Spanish border region in Texas; and in 1806 Pike went to explore the southernmost border region north of New Spain. His orders were to explore the Arkansas and Red Rivers, but by February of 1807 he had reached the upper reaches of the Rio Grande having missed the Red River entirely: "Spanish authorities learned of his presence and sent a force to arrest him and his men. They were taken to Santa Fe and then sent on to Chihuahua. Pike's maps and papers were confiscated, but he managed to retain his diary and journals by secreting them in the gun barrels of his men. Apparently he was able to convince the Spaniards that he had entered New Spain by accident, as he was escorted by armed guard through Texas via San Antonio to the Sabine, where he was released. He arrived at Natchioches in June, 1807, having thus had the opportunity to examine New Mexico and Texas in some detail, at the expense of the Spanish government." (Jenkins). "In the hierarchy of significant westward expeditions, that of Lieutenant Zebulon Montgomery Pike (1779-1813) ranks right below that of Lewis and Clark. While his was not the first official reconnaissance of the west, he provided 'the earliest official geographical image of the trans-Mississippi West'. Pike's map and journal.provided the first authentic information about the Upper Mississippi. On the Conejos River, an effluent of the Rio Grande, well into Spanish territory, Pike boldly constructed a fort. It was at this fort that he was arrested and taken first to Santa Fe and then to Chihuahua for a meeting with Don Nemesio Salcedo, the governor of New Spain. The authorities confiscated, among other documents, a manuscript map of the Santa Fe Trail. While in custody of the Spanish, Pike learned 'just how many and what kind of troops the Spanish had on hand to defend the northern provinces,' according to William Goetzmann, 'and he was well informed on the character and personalities of all the Spanish military leaders. No more successful espionage operation has ever been conducted in recorded American history.' Pike returned from captivity without his sketch maps, making the creation of his own map more difficult. He had managed to smuggle traverse tables in the rifle barrels that he and his men were allowed to take with them after being released. These tables enabled him to reconstruct parts of the upper Arkansas, and to his credit, his map is the first to accurately delineate the Arkansas and its tributaries. Nevertheless, large sections of 'A Chart of the Internal Part of Louisiana' (1810), were based on Alexander von Humboldt's map . It is paradoxical that Pike, Buchnummer des Verkäufers 001999

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